One in 30 baby boomers has hepatitis C

Hepatitis C is a serious blood-borne disease that people live with for years or even decades with no symptoms while the disease slowly damages their liver. One in thirty baby boomers, those born from 1945 to 1965, has hepatitis C and most don’t even know it. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that all baby boomers get tested for hepatitis C.

Dr. Laura Kornegay, Health Director for the Central Shenandoah Health District, discusses the disease.

Boomers looking to retire closer to home in active communities – The Denver Post

After living in Prince George’s County, Maryland for 36 years, John and Theresa Leeke sold their five-bedroom house and moved in 2016 to a three-bedroom home, part of an age-restricted community for people 55 and older in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

“We had been looking for several years for a one-level home. We wanted to downsize but not go very far,” says John Leeke, 78, a retired management and human resources consultant.

The Leekes found their single-floor dwelling in Two Rivers, a community in Odenton, Maryland, where about 830 of the 2,090 houses being constructed are designated for residents age 55 and older. John Leeke says living there offers numerous advantages. “I no longer have to cut the grass and shovel snow. There is a wonderful clubhouse for fitness and social activities.”

Five days a week, Leeke works out in the community exercise room and swims laps in the indoor pool, just a short walk from his home. “I’m in pretty decent shape,” he says.

The demand for such amenities and programs promoting physical, mental and social health is on the rise in age-restricted communities like Two Rivers, where the Leekes and their neighbors live independently.

Housing expert Gregg Logan of the real estate firm RCLCO in Orlando, says the emphasis on healthy living is part of a change in these communities in response to the boomer retirement wave.

The trend in 55-plus communities, Logan and others say, is away from the golf courses, formal clubhouses and cookie-cutter homes.

Now seniors are being accommodated with fitness facilities, walking trails and casual spaces for gatherings, dining and classes, plus a variety of housing – attached villas, condominiums and single-family models.

These new homes typically offer open floor plans, gourmet kitchens, ground-floor master suites and smaller secondary bedrooms “big enough for visiting kids but not so big,” Logan says. Buyers of these dwellings, he notes, are spending on average about the same amount or 20 percent less than the value of their former homes.

Five days a week, Leeke works out in the community exercise room and swims laps in the indoor pool, just a short walk from his home.

Photo by Justin T. Gellerson, The Washington Post

Five days a week, Leeke works out in the community exercise room and swims laps in the indoor pool, just a short walk from his home.

About 80 percent of boomers are retiring where they currently live to be near children and grandchildren, Logan says, rather than moving to the Sun Belt. The small percentage who opt to move to local retirement communities are seeking opportunities to exercise, learn and socialize.

“People buy community first,” Logan says. “They want access to amenities and educational programs, and to pursue activities they’ve always wanted to try, like photography, gardening or cooking.”

Essential to senior-centered developments are “clubhouses with exercise and socializing components, walking trails and agricultural amenities that promote health and wellness opportunities,” says William Gerald, vice president of acquisition and development for the Bethesda, Maryland-based Classic Group, the developer of Two Rivers.

“Over the past 10 years, food and cooking has become a much greater social component of retirement communities,” Gerald says. The 15,000-square-foot clubhouse for seniors at Two Rivers accommodates that need with a culinary center incorporating a demonstration kitchen.

Two Rivers is named for its location between the Patuxent and Little Patuxent rivers. Now being planned for the community is an agricultural park situated within a 100-acre parcel. The Classic Group is working with the University of Maryland to develop garden plots for the residents, greenhouses and a community farm operation.

How baby boomers, GenX can adapt to millennial co-workers

MANILA – Filipino companies need to discard stereotypes and adapt instead to the millennial workforce, to ensure productivity and succession in leadership, a management consultant said Monday.

Local firms can learn from multinational and business process outsourcing companies that allow millennials flexible work schedules and even the option to work from home, said Boris Joaquin, president of Breakthrough Leadership Management Consultancy.

“We need to get a good understanding of where millennials are coming from,” Joaquin told ANC’s Market Edge with Cathy Yang.

“Millennials need to feel that they belong, and when they do, loyalty follows,” he said, adding millennials were on track to comprise 70 percent of the local workforce.

Millennials are “more purposeful” compared to baby boomers and Generation X, who are “more compliant,” Joaquin said.

“There’s a lot of myths going around like millennials are entitled, millennials are impatient… But I think, the truth behind that is millennials to begin with are purpose-driven individuals,” he said.

Baby Boomers, Don’t Make These Huge Job Search Mistakes

Retirement is on the horizon, but many baby boomers are reluctant to stop working. Twenty-seven percent of boomers don’t expect to hang up their hat until they’re 70 or older, a 2017 Insured Retirement Institute survey found. Half of boomers polled said their fallback plan if savings ran short in retirement was to go back to work.

Sticking with a job or going back to work sounds like a good strategy, especially for the many retirees and near-retirees who are facing a savings shortfall. (More than half of boomers and seniors have less the $50,000 set aside for retirement, according to GoBankingRates.) Yet finding a new job once you’ve hit the mid-century mark can be tough.

Ladies, Do You Know The Three Threats To Your Retirement?

We all want a colorful retirement with opportunities to travel, visit grand kids, start a hobby, golf, read a book, or just relax in the front porch rocking chair.

But before we get too cozy, we have to make certain we have prepared for the three threats to retirement. There are other threats to be sure, but these three are “normal” and “expected,” and if not planned for, then there is a strong chance we could outlive our money!

• Inflation

• Real Rates of Return

• Life Expectancy

Inflation

The most significant reason for planning your finances is to ensure that your money stays even with, and hopefully outpaces inflation. Inflation is the silent killer of the purchasing power of money. Prices tend to go up over time. Your plan has to cover these increases.

Financially, you have to at least keep your purchasing power to stay even with inflation. If you put all your money in the bank and delay creating a plan, you are indeed making a decision and starting a plan.

Inflation is the increase of the cost of goods and services. We recognize that things may cost more next year than now. This is expected for a strong economy that continually has increasing growth. Inflation has been very low in the last decade when compared to historical numbers but is likely to increase again.

Real Rates of Return

Not all investment choices will keep you even with or ahead of inflation. You have to invest to beat inflation and the impact of taxes. The real rate of return that I am talking about is (a) the growth of your money after you consider your tax bracket and (b) the increasing cost of goods and services (inflation). Remember, purchasing power is measured from your take-home money and its ability to purchase goods after the impact of inflation. You have to keep taxes and inflation in mind when you calculate the real rate of return. Historically, the “easy” investments of CDs and other bank deposit accounts don’t keep you even with inflation. You have to “grow” some of your money to outpace inflation.

Life Expectancy

The final reason why creating your financial plan is so important is that the average life expectancy is getting longer and longer. You have to create a financial plan that anticipates your increasing longevity.

I have said it before and will say it again: “You don’t want to be an old lady on a fixed income.” You have to create a growth plan for life! If you have only traditional bank deposits (CDs, checking, savings, money market accounts), you are on a fixed income.

If you look at life expectancy chart, a sixty-year-old woman’s “expectancy” is 24.37 more years. This means there is a 50 percent chance she will live longer than 24.37 more years. If she invests money in bank deposit accounts, she will quickly lose purchasing power and be in trouble in years to come.

How much do you think a stamp, or car, or home, or that rocking chair will cost in 24 more years?

Whether it is through death, divorce, or choosing to remain single, women have up to a ninety percent chance at some point in their lives of having to be solely responsible for their finances. Even in strong healthy marriages, many women need to take a greater interest in the household finances. Now, with the baby boomers moving toward retirement, the number of women who will find themselves financially alone is predicted to dramatically increase.

Why bother to create a Plan? Because if you don’t, these three threats will likely impact your colorful retirement.

Learning To Live Life On Your Terms For Overcoming The Fear Of Aging And Death

The secure and real you is never concerned about overcoming fear of death and certainly knows that when you are through using your body for its intended purpose, you’ll peacefully lay it aside.

When I speak to groups of people in the Baby Boomer age range I seem to be asked quite often about overcoming fear of death, while those quite younger seem to more easily accept the terms of life in this world.

To help those who are afraid of death I like to ask them to consider a few things:

We all deserve to live life on our own terms, reaching goals and dreams with a life lived at full potential.

When you choose to embrace life without fear each day, you begin tapping into your power of mind and real inner strength takes charge over the ego, which is always in fear of something.

Being afraid of death can quite often be, that they are afraid that when their time has come they will find they really didn’t live life to the fullest.

The fearless you who is not afraid of death will move on within eternity, just as joyful as you’ve always been.

Moving on by letting go

The ego resists letting go and moving on from fear and is always thinking about overcoming the fear of aging and death, and merely can’t.

It never wants to be a part of or joined with Truth; thus it promotes belief-making.

The ego in us all tries and bring our mind to its promising, but never peaceful, thought system.

The ego will cry out as it chants: “You got ta believe!”

These are the beliefs that try to make us search for ways to overcoming fear of death, yet all along have us afraid of alternative and new ways of considering not only life in this world, but yourself and the Divine.

The ego-based mind tries to hang and make beliefs onto them, so your vision to the light of real knowledge about eternal life is obscured.

Isn’t much of humankind in constant conflict over right and wrong beliefs in just about everything?

One group may say, “Our way is the only way to believe” or “This religion is the very first rock the church was built on” or “This holy text is the only true word of God.”

Self-doubt

These and many other beliefs keep our minds dividing and fragmenting its allegiance to separate kingdoms; but the actual commitment is only to confusion, self-doubt, and let’s not forget fear.

It really only matters at all to you, and the path of your true free will–which is what keeps you happy and at peace within yourself, and never having to worry about overcoming fear of death.

A Course in Miracles states, “When we look at the ego, then, we are not considering delusions but dynamics.”

Does it really matter which version of any religious scripture gives someone more comfort and understanding than it may for someone else?

The Holy Spirit’s interpretation of anything is the same as your true vision, rather than what someone may suggest is best for you.

Living at your full potential

You are not accepting the power of the Universe as it is intended for you if you choose not to accept this knowledge of yourself.

Any belief you accept, apart from what you truly know, is obstructing God’s Voice in you that guides you to life lived at full potential. When allow for this guidance you are allowing for everyday miracle manifestation into your life

Manifesting miracles in your life

There is no other body, or organized group of bodies, be it religious, political, or otherwise, that knows you as who you truly are.

A Course in Miracles further teaches us, “Everyone has experienced what he would call a sense of being transported beyond himself.”

This true essence of yourself is your holiness and it’s an experience you know, which is your Divinity and is whole.

By not accepting this power as yours, you are then seeing God’s creation as weak, and the weak are those who are afraid of death, and angry and therefore frightened.

This weakness is exactly what the dream of separation, or ego-based mind, is all about.

To embracing life without fear

Baby boomers aging the nation, and the region – News – News Chief

Sarasota-Manatee’s median age keeps marching upward

The population of Sarasota and Manatee counties does not rank among the oldest in the United States but, like two-thirds of the nation’s counties, its median age keeps edging upward.

According to updated data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau, as of July 2016, the median age reached 55.6 in Sarasota County and 47.8 in Manatee.

By comparison, the nation’s median age reached 37.9 — up from 35.3 since 2000.

“Our country’s demographic profile is aging and looks a lot different than it did two decades ago,” bureau demographer Lauren Medina said in an announcement.

“The baby-boom generation is largely responsible for this trend,” Peter Borsella, a bureau demographer, added. “Baby boomers began turning 65 in 2011 and will continue to do so for many years to come.”

Residents age 65 and older now account for 15.2 percent of the nation’s population, up from 12.4 percent in 2000.

As of 2016, Maine continued to have the highest median age (44.6) — followed by New Hampshire (43), Vermont (42.7) and West Virginia (42.2). Although better known than those states as a retirement mecca, Florida ranked fifth with a median age of 42.1.

The youngest states or jurisdictions include North Dakota (34.8), Texas (34.5), Alaska (33.9), the District of Columbia (33.9) and Utah (30.8).

The acceleration of the age boom in Florida has compelled more communities here to join the Age-Friendly movement, an initiative sponsored by the World Health Organization and AARP to help populations prepare for the effects of this demographic shift. Kathy Black, a professor at University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee who is instrumental in the Age-Friendly Sarasota effort, said recently that it’s important for people to question their own assumptions about others based on age.

“The world is dealing with ageism, and it plays out in interactions with people; there’s a lot of social capital that’s languishing in our communities,” she said. “The county and government are one aspect of an age-friendly, but people power is a lot more important. Transportation and housing are the biggest issues.”

Florida’s Sumter County, home to a large portion of of the sprawling 55-and-older community The Villages, topped the list of counties in having the highest median age at 67.1 — having increased from 49.2 since 2000. With a median age of 58.8 (up from 54.3 in 2000), Charlotte County followed Catron County, New Mexico, (60.5) to rank as the county with the third oldest population in the country.

If you want to live in the community with the youngest overall population in the nation, you will have to move to Chattahoochee County, Georgia. Do not expect to find a partying college town, though. Its youthful demographic can be attributed to the fact that the Fort Benning military base covers nearly three-fourths of the county. Yet even Chattahoochee’s median age of 24.4 is getting older, up from 23.2 in 2000.

Sarasota: 1 in 3 are seniors

As expected, Florida, which continues to attract about 1,000 new residents daily, is getting grayer. From 2010 to 2016, the Sunshine State’s median age steadily rose from 40.8 to 42.1.

In Sarasota County, the median age is up from 52.6 in 2000 to 55.6 as of last summer.

Of the county’s overall population of 412,569, females continued to outnumber males, 215,622 to 196,947. They also tended to be older, 57 compared to 54.1 for the men.

Of the population younger than 18, however, Sarasota County’s males slightly outnumbered females — 30,867 to 29,065. That age group is expanding at a slower rate than others, at 59,932 compared with 59,642 seven years ago.

The 18-to-64 age bracket has grown since 2000 in Sarasota County but not as much as the senior population. Census takers counted 206,718 (99,280 men and 107,438 women) as of last July compared with 201,602 six years earlier.

Compare that with the growth in the 65-and-older category, which accounts for slightly more than a third of the county’s total population. The 2016 census shows 145,919 Sarasota residents in that group (66,800 men outnumbered by 79,119 women) compared with 118,796 in 2000.

Of those 145,919 seniors, 22,900 (9,411 men and 13,489 women) were age 85 or older — up from 18,229 in 2000.

Manatee: Counting more kids

Manatee’s population of 375,888 is considerably younger than its neighboring county. Yet it, too, is seeing its median age on the rise — at 47.8 compared with 45.8 in 2000.

Manatee’s female residents also tend to be older than the males, with a median age of 49.2 compared with 46.2 for the guys.

The younger than 18 crowd in Manatee is growing faster than the same age group in Sarasota County, with 71,416 compared with 66,147 seven years ago. That boost can be at least partially attributed to families with children moving into Manatee’s booming suburbs, which are experiencing a demand for more schools.

As they do in Sarasota County, however, infants, children and teens comprise the only age bracket in which males outnumber females — 36,326 compared with 35,091.

The 18-to-64 group in Manatee increased from 181,716 in 2000 to 205,996 by last summer. Women in that category outnumbered the men, 106,355 to 99,641.

Yet compare that 13.3 percent jump in young and middle-aged adults with the 30 percent increase Manatee experienced in the 65-and-older category.

Census takers counted 98,476 seniors in Manatee (26 percent of the total population) compared with 75,583 six years earlier (when that segment comprised 23 percent of the total). Older women outnumbered men in their age group 52,855 to 45,631.

Of that elder population, 13,396 (5,600 men and 7,796 women) were age 85 or older — compared with 10,040 in 2000.

 

Herald-Tribune Staff Writer Barbara Peters Smith contributed to this report.

 

 

Don’t leave baby boomers behind when designing wearable technology

Wearable devices have been heralded as one of the next great technological frontiers. They can provide all users, including older ones, with constantly updated medical information by tracking cardiac health, identifying potential illnesses, and serving as emergency alert systems, among other benefits. That is, if you can get older users to adopt wearable technology. In their article in the July 2017 issue of Ergonomics in Design, “Designing Wearable Technology for an Aging Population,” human factors/ergonomics researchers lay out a framework for improving the usability of wearable technology for older adults.

According to Joanna Lewis, a doctoral student of applied experimental and human factors psychology at the University of Central Florida, “The proportion of the population over the age of 65 is growing and will continue to do so. Technological developments are exponentially growing and inundating our lives, and we don’t want a demographic that is scaling up in size not to have access to devices that are becoming prolific in everyday society.”

Although wearable devices can serve as important tools for older adults, Lewis and coauthor Mark Neider found that poor design decisions that fail to address the aging population’s needs can undermine the technology’s value. Older adults also tend to experience feelings of mistrust and frustration when using new devices, with the result that they often abandon otherwise worthwhile technology.

Taking into account the role of age-linked declines in cognitive, physical, and sensory abilities, the authors identified several critical areas for improvement. These include reducing the steps required for users to complete a given action, minimizing the need for multitasking, eliminating time constraints for completing a task, and increasing the size of buttons, icons, and text. Lewis and Neider also caution designers to avoid clunky or outdated exteriors that may result in age-related stereotypes or cause users to feel stigmatized by their peers.

“A device’s usability should consider all ages,” Lewis adds. “Potential issues with wearable devices for older adults can be avoided by acknowledging limitations, and development teams can create effective and safe platforms that appeal to a variety of end users.”

###

To receive a copy of “Designing Wearable Technology for an Aging Population” for media-reporting purposes, contact HFES Communications Director Lois Smith (310/394-1811, [email protected]).

The Human Factors and Ergonomics Society is the world’s largest scientific association for human factors/ergonomics professionals, with more than 4,500 members globally. HFES members include psychologists and other scientists, designers, and engineers, all of whom have a common interest in designing systems and equipment to be safe and effective for the people who operate and maintain them. “Human Factors and Ergonomics: People-Friendly Design Through Science and Engineering.”

Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

Baby boomers aging the nation, and the region – News – Sarasota Herald-Tribune

The population of Sarasota and Manatee counties does not rank among the oldest in the United States but, like two-thirds of the nation’s counties, its median age keeps edging upward.

According to updated data released today by the U.S. Census Bureau, as of July 2016, the median age reached 55.6 in Sarasota County and 47.8 in Manatee.

By comparison, the nation’s median age reached 37.9 — up from 35.3 since 2000.

“Our country’s demographic profile is aging and looks a lot different than it did two decades ago,” bureau demographer Lauren Medina said in an announcement.

“The baby-boom generation is largely responsible for this trend,” Peter Borsella, a bureau demographer, added. “Baby boomers began turning 65 in 2011 and will continue to do so for many years to come.”

Residents age 65 and older now account for 15.2 percent of the nation’s population, up from 12.4 percent in 2000.

As of 2016, Maine continued to have the highest median age (44.6) — followed by New Hampshire (43), Vermont (42.7) and West Virginia (42.2). Although better known than those states as a retirement mecca, Florida ranked fifth with a median age of 42.1.

The youngest states or jurisdictions include North Dakota (34.8), Texas (34.5), Alaska (33.9), the District of Columbia (33.9) and Utah (30.8).

The acceleration of the age boom in Florida has compelled more communities here to join the Age-Friendly movement, an initiative sponsored by the World Health Organization and AARP to help populations prepare for the effects of this demographic shift. Kathy Black, a professor at University of South Florida Sarasota-Manatee who is instrumental in the Age-Friendly Sarasota effort, said recently that it’s important for people to question their own assumptions about others based on age.

“The world is dealing with ageism, and it plays out in interactions with people; there’s a lot of social capital that’s languishing in our communities,” she said. “The county and government are one aspect of an age-friendly, but people power is a lot more important. Transportation and housing are the biggest issues.”

Florida’s Sumter County, home to a large portion of of the sprawling 55-and-older community The Villages, topped the list of counties in having the highest median age at 67.1 — having increased from 49.2 since 2000. With a median age of 58.8 (up from 54.3 in 2000), Charlotte County followed Catron County, New Mexico, (60.5) to rank as the county with the third oldest population in the country.

If you want to live in the community with the youngest overall population in the nation, you will have to move to Chattahoochee County, Georgia. Do not expect to find a partying college town, though. Its youthful demographic can be attributed to the fact that the Fort Benning military base covers nearly three-fourths of the county. Yet even Chattahoochee’s median age of 24.4 is getting older, up from 23.2 in 2000.

Sarasota: 1 in 3 are seniors

As expected, Florida, which continues to attract about 1,000 new residents daily, is getting grayer. From 2010 to 2016, the Sunshine State’s median age steadily rose from 40.8 to 42.1.

In Sarasota County, the median age is up from 52.6 in 2000 to 55.6 as of last summer.

Of the county’s overall population of 412,569, females continued to outnumber males, 215,622 to 196,947. They also tended to be older, 57 compared to 54.1 for the men.

Of the population younger than 18, however, Sarasota County’s males slightly outnumbered females — 30,867 to 29,065. That age group is expanding at a slower rate than others, at 59,932 compared with 59,642 seven years ago.

The 18-to-64 age bracket has grown since 2000 in Sarasota County but not as much as the senior population. Census takers counted 206,718 (99,280 men and 107,438 women) as of last July compared with 201,602 six years earlier.

Compare that with the growth in the 65-and-older category, which accounts for slightly more than a third of the county’s total population. The 2016 census shows 145,919 Sarasota residents in that group (66,800 men outnumbered by 79,119 women) compared with 118,796 in 2000.

Of those 145,919 seniors, 22,900 (9,411 men and 13,489 women) were age 85 or older — up from 18,229 in 2000.

Manatee: Counting more kids

Manatee’s population of 375,888 is considerably younger than its neighboring county. Yet it, too, is seeing its median age on the rise — at 47.8 compared with 45.8 in 2000.

Manatee’s female residents also tend to be older than the males, with a median age of 49.2 compared with 46.2 for the guys.

The younger than 18 crowd in Manatee is growing faster than the same age group in Sarasota County, with 71,416 compared with 66,147 seven years ago. That boost can be at least partially attributed to families with children moving into Manatee’s booming suburbs, which are experiencing a demand for more schools.

As they do in Sarasota County, however, infants, children and teens comprise the only age bracket in which males outnumber females — 36,326 compared with 35,091.

The 18-to-64 group in Manatee increased from 181,716 in 2000 to 205,996 by last summer. Women in that category outnumbered the men, 106,355 to 99,641.

Yet compare that 13.3 percent jump in young and middle-aged adults with the 30 percent increase Manatee experienced in the 65-and-older category.

Census takers counted 98,476 seniors in Manatee (26 percent of the total population) compared with 75,583 six years earlier (when that segment comprised 23 percent of the total). Older women outnumbered men in their age group 52,855 to 45,631.

Of that elder population, 13,396 (5,600 men and 7,796 women) were age 85 or older — compared with 10,040 in 2000.

 

Herald-Tribune Staff Writer Barbara Peters Smith contributed to this report.