Mad Men: Sally Draper – The Baby Boomers Are Alright



Get a full month of MUBI FOR FREE: (With the support of Creative Europe – MEDIA Programme of the European Union) | Sally Draper (Kiernan Shipka) — the baby boomer of Matthew Weiner’s Mad Men — is essentially you or your parents. Watch our take and find out what her story tells us about the boomer generation. Support ScreenPrism on Patreon:

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27 replies
  1. Zenzi Cubik
    Zenzi Cubik says:

    This video retrospective pin-points with excruciating accuracy the real reason why I found this show so repellent, why I never bothered to watch it. It was a show about my parents' generation, not mine. And it was a show essentially about darkness. I don't remember my childhood as being at all dark despite the 'tumultuous' times we 'endured' as children. And I don't remember watching so much television. When I look at my Youtube recommendations (such as this one) I see where their algorithms fail so much with me. Just because I've been categorized as a 'baby-boomer' doesn't mean that I"m going to like every program purportedly about my childhood. Far from it.

  2. Elizabeth L.
    Elizabeth L. says:

    If boomers went through this kind of a struggle, why are they being so callous about climate change and gun control? They should be the loudest voices advocating for positive social change. Instead they're leaving it to…actual children so they can benefit from the destruction of our society (gun violence, corporate and political greed etc.) ://

  3. Maidels Marie
    Maidels Marie says:

    Sally's childhood does not exemplify how the average family headed by the greatest generation raised its kids. It exemplifies how boomers raised theirs. Divorce, remarriage(s), narcissism, neglect, premature exposure to adult subjects, no organized religion, latch key kids, etc…Most of these taboos were unthinkable a generation before.

  4. KaylaNoelle1
    KaylaNoelle1 says:

    Honestly, I think being raised by TV is still way better than being raised by the internet. Because of the porn industry and all the porn-pop-ups you would get on an old computer I literally thought that sex was when a man beats a woman, spits on her, and calls her names until she somehow gets pregnant??? I was around 6. I also went on chatrooms during my parent's divorce and ended up spilling my feelings out to actual pedophiles and then wondering why they always asked me such weird questions if they were really kids my age.

  5. Kris
    Kris says:

    Im 25. My parents were generation x I believe the late 70s. They weren't helicopter parents but alot more attentive for how much they worked. Better life than my mom had growing up. I think they did a good job making sure I was stable tho i do wish they taught me about more things. They were "just let me do it"ers and now I'm one. So I gotta fix that teach not just do for.

  6. angie 808
    angie 808 says:

    So on-point with Sally's analysis. I found myself rooting for Sally throughout the series, even when she was rebelling – or maybe especially when she was rebelling against Don & Betty. She was pissed-off a lot, and I totally understood why she would be. She seemed – at times – more grown up than the grown-ups. Good job! 😊❤️

  7. sbasireddy19
    sbasireddy19 says:

    I seriously love your Mad Men videos… I just finished all of the seasons last week and it's for sure one one of my favorite shows. Your analysis makes me feel so much for the characters and sheds so much light on things I never would have realized.

    Now I'm just waiting for Lane Pryce…

  8. bob polo
    bob polo says:

    Not that I have a problem with Mad Men's limited range of racial diversity, but the show is literally and purposefully about white Americans in a specific time of history. With that being said, it's irresponsible to say that these characters represent the audience members who watched the show because that's implying that these characters are universal representatives; they're not. Good criticism would explicitly make known that this is a show about white Americans and the characters represent white Americans. And I love the show, but when you say that Sally Draper represents "our parents", whose parents are you talking about? Does Sally Draper represent the parents of Irish, Jewish, Italian, and African Americans from the era of the show? Some qualification needs to be added to certain statements in order to prevent confusion and unintentional offense.

    Again, I love the show. Don't hurt me

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