The 5 Ways Baby Boomers Changed Sex And Desire Forever – Huffington Post

A few years ago, Huff/Post50 ran a post boasting how the Baby Boomer generation changed sex forever and in dramatic ways. In today’s world of broadening acceptance, that post seems like a relic. Do you agree? Here’s what we wrote, edited for updates:

Yes, Virginia, there was a time when everyone waited until their wedding night to have intercourse. And perhaps even more shocking: Yes, that’s actually what they called it. For real. Everything about what currently occurs in our bedrooms has completely changed since boomers came of age — including the fact that “what we do in our bedrooms” is no longer only being done in our bedrooms. Sex has spilled over on to our kitchen counters, our beaches and the front seat of our Ferraris if “The Wolf of Wall Street” is to be believed.

While boomers may not have invented sex (the way we did the internet), we certainly pushed its envelope and altered the way it is done, with whom, when and where, and even why. Here are five things boomers have done to change the course of the history of sex:

1. Boomers made outdoor sex OK.
What? You thought Woodstock was about the music? Sorry to disappoint, but nobody was really listening to Jimi Hendrix. That’s right. And while the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame knows of no head count of babies born nine months later, 1967 wasn’t dubbed “The Summer of Love” because of Ritchie Havens singing “Freedom.”

But freedom was at the core of things. In 1965, five years after oral contraception got FDA approval, 6.5 million American women were on the pill, making it the most popular form of birth control in the U.S. and freeing a generation from the fear of unwanted pregnancies.

2. Boomers made indoor sex more interesting.
Anyone remember Plato’s Retreat? Me neither. But the notorious swingers’ club epitomized the free-sex atmosphere of pre-AIDS New York City. Clothing was optional, only couples were admitted (although encouraged to mingle), and the centerpiece of the experience was a public “mat room” for exhibitionist sex. Going to the mats took on a whole new meaning when Plato’s opened in 1977.

AIDS, of course, changed everything.

3. Boomers took honoring thy neighbor to the biblical level.
Long before car keys were collected at parties from those who drank too much, suburban swingers in the 1970s collected them for a different reason. As they entered the party, the men would deposit their car keys in a bowl by the front door. On the way out, the women would fish a set of keys from the bowl and that’s who they’d go home with.

Boomers invented the American Swinger.

A Psychology Today report in 2013 dubbed the 1971 study by Gilbert D. Bartell “the most in-depth look on the swinging culture to date.” And here’s what Bartell found: Of the estimated one to two million American Swingers, most were middle-class suburbanites. In a fact that can only amuse, the Bartell study found that a whopping 42% of the male Swingers were salesmen. More than three-fourths of the female Swingers were stay-at-home housewives, most of them with kids. Contrary to what some critics believed, Swingers tended to be anti-drug and “anti-hippie,” not at all aligned with the lifestyle or values of the counterculture. Swinging, Bartell found, was something quite different than the “free love” of the sexual revolution, and its advocates wanted to have little to do with the rebellious, anti-establishment youth culture. Mostly, they just wanted to have sex with someone other than their spouses.

4. Boomers changed the language of sex.
Calling sex “intercourse” went out the window long before Bill Clinton wished Monica Lewinsky would have. While our former Prez “didn’t have sex with that woman,” the term for doing the nasty (that’d be circa 1977) used to be balling in the 1960s. For a while, women were “boinked,” “porked” or “got laid.” Sometimes, we got “nookie” or were “screwed” and occasionally they had a “slap and tickle.” Today people “hook up.” And of course, the F-word has been around since the cavemen and that’s probably who still uses it the most.

5. Boomers changed dating rituals.
Because we fumbled them so badly, obviously! Aside from inventing the internet, which made it possible for online dating sites to exist, boomers totally blew dating. We may have originated the one-night stand, but we always struggled with long-lasting relationships. Maybe the bad bar scene and the people our mothers fixed us up with were just the kiss of dating death. Admit it: If anyone today bellied up to the bar next to you and asked you what your astrological sign was, you’d probably run for the exits, right? Yes, much safer to sit with your tablet swiping Tinder prospects to the side.

Nowadays, you see someone’s profile and start following them on Twitter. You check out their LinkedIn profile and see who they’re friends with on Facebook. One of the selling points of some dating apps is that they actually show whether you have friends in common so you can do some real-time investigating. The result is that long before you meet the person, you know his or her online persona, which as one younger friend noted, sometimes is a total disconnect from the real person.

Still, we think it probably beats putting your keys in a bowl.

Growing up together, TV and baby boomers were a perfect fit – STLtoday.com

NEW YORK — Unlike baby boomers, television has no birth certificate.

TV’s arrival, depending on how you see it, can be marked at any of a number of moments in the last century.

Maybe 1927, when 21-year-old Philo Farnsworth transmitted the image of a horizontal line to a receiver in the next room of his San Francisco lab.

Or maybe 1939, when the RCA Television Pavilion opened at the New York World’s Fair with the exciting news that RCA’s National Broadcasting Co. would expand from radio into TV, and, to spread the word, telecast the ceremony to the scattering of 2,000 TV sets throughout all of New York City.

But the handiest year for TV’s genesis is 1946 — when technology, optimism and renewed consumer buying power joined forces at World War II’s conclusion and gave broadcast television a belated kick-start.

By chance (or is it?), the same year that ushered in the TV age is also seen as the kickoff for the baby-boom generation — the population boom of kids born between 1946 and 1964.

TV was key to the world baby boomers were born into: a newly modernized world where every problem (with the possible exception of the Cold War) seemed to point to a solution that was just around the corner. Polio would be cured! Man would go into space! Electricity, thanks to atomic energy, would soon be “too cheap to meter.” Even African-Americans, oppressed for so long, had new reason for hope.

The UNIVAC computer, introduced in 1951, would count the U.S. population and forecast Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1952 presidential win. It could even help volunteers find love and marriage, as TV host Art Linkletter demonstrated on his 1950s game show, “People Are Funny.”

TV chronicled this bracing wave of wonder and potential, and built upon it as an essential part of what set boomers apart: They were pampered and privileged and groomed for a sure-to-be-glorious tomorrow.

No wonder kids claimed TV as their own. No wonder TV eagerly returned the favor, singling them out as an irresistible demographic.

Granted, there wasn’t much prime-time network programming in the fall of 1946, and what there was seemed targeted to adults (including Gillette-sponsored sports every Friday on NBC and, on the DuMont network every Wednesday, TV’s first soap opera).

But kids were squarely in the sights of TV programmers by December 1947, when “Howdy Doody” premiered on NBC as a weekday children’s show. Set in fictional Doodyville, where stringed puppets cavorted with its flesh-and-blood host, “Buffalo Bob” Smith, “Howdy Doody” during its 13-year run would prove to be a huge hit, and much more: a formative influence on nearly every baby boomer’s childhood.

For a glimpse of early boomers, check YouTube for archived clips of “Howdy Doody,” which welcomed kids to the Peanut Gallery, the name it coined for its studio audience. Captured on vintage ’50s kinescopes, those youngsters represent a TV face (albeit made up, regrettably, of only white faces) of the surging boomer generation.

Then, on Jan. 19, 1953, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo celebrated the birth of a son on “I Love Lucy” — the same day the sitcom’s star, Lucille Ball, gave birth to a son with her real-life husband and leading man, Desi Arnaz.

This couple’s fact-and-fiction child took his place as “the crown prince of the television generation and baby boomers,” says Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture, with infant Desi, Jr., soon “anointed on the cover of the first TV Guide.”

Thus did TV and the boomers grow up together. And as the nation overall embraced television’s early offerings, such as Milton Berle’s comedy revue, Ed Sullivan’s variety hour and “Lucy,” youngsters realized they had a special bond with TV.

That is, they could use it as an embryonic form of rebellion against their elders, years before the campus unrest with which their generation would become identified. Those children innately understood that television, despite being welcomed into every living room, wasn’t “good” for them. This made watching TV all the more appealing as they fought their parents’ constant pleas to “go outside and play.”

Today, more than a half-century later, the TV experience isn’t nearly so much about viewing as immersion. It doesn’t just bring the world to the audience, it IS the world. As TV merges with the natural world, it also continues to merge with other screened devices, further increasing its presence.

So where does this leave aging boomers? They may still recall a TV universe of only three or four channels on a TV screen, when the viewer had to walk to the set to change channels.

It’s been a long time since TV consecrated boomer teens with a daily rock-and-roll dance show, “American Bandstand.” With that, its host, Dick Clark, is said to have “created youth culture.”

Boomers, the pioneering swath of youth culture, this year observe birthdays ranging from 52 to 70.

TV is getting older, too. But unlike boomers, it enjoys constant renewal. It never looks its age, whatever that may be.


EDITOR’S NOTE — Frazier Moore is a national television columnist for The Associated Press. He can be reached at [email protected] and at http://www.twitter.com/tvfrazier. Past stories are available at http://bigstory.ap.org/content/frazier-moore

Growing up together, TV and baby boomers were a perfect fit – The News (subscription)

TV’s arrival, depending on how you see it, can be marked at any of a number of moments in the last century.

Maybe 1927, when 21-year-old Philo Farnsworth transmitted the image of a horizontal line to a receiver in the next room of his San Francisco lab.

Or maybe 1939, when the RCA Television Pavilion opened at the New York World’s Fair with the exciting news that RCA’s National Broadcasting Co. would expand from radio into TV, and, to spread the word, telecast the ceremony to the scattering of 2,000 TV sets throughout all of New York City.

But the handiest year for TV’s genesis is 1946 — when technology, optimism and renewed consumer buying power joined forces at World War II’s conclusion and gave broadcast television a belated kick-start.

By chance (or is it?), the same year that ushered in the TV age is also seen as the kickoff for the baby-boom generation — the population boom of kids born between 1946 and 1964.

TV was key to the world baby boomers were born into: a newly modernized world where every problem (with the possible exception of the Cold War) seemed to point to a solution that was just around the corner. Polio would be cured! Man would go into space! Electricity, thanks to atomic energy, would soon be “too cheap to meter.” Even African-Americans, oppressed for so long, had new reason for hope.

The UNIVAC computer, introduced in 1951, would count the U.S. population and forecast Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1952 presidential win. It could even help volunteers find love and marriage, as TV host Art Linkletter demonstrated on his 1950s game show, “People Are Funny.”

TV chronicled this bracing wave of wonder and potential, and built upon it as an essential part of what set boomers apart: They were pampered and privileged and groomed for a sure-to-be-glorious tomorrow.

No wonder kids claimed TV as their own. No wonder TV eagerly returned the favor, singling them out as an irresistible demographic.

Granted, there wasn’t much prime-time network programming in the fall of 1946, and what there was seemed targeted to adults (including Gillette-sponsored sports every Friday on NBC and, on the DuMont network every Wednesday, TV’s first soap opera).

But kids were squarely in the sights of TV programmers by December 1947, when “Howdy Doody” premiered on NBC as a weekday children’s show. Set in fictional Doodyville, where stringed puppets cavorted with its flesh-and-blood host, “Buffalo Bob” Smith, “Howdy Doody” during its 13-year run would prove to be a huge hit, and much more: a formative influence on nearly every baby boomer’s childhood.

For a glimpse of early boomers, check YouTube for archived clips of “Howdy Doody,” which welcomed kids to the Peanut Gallery, the name it coined for its studio audience. Captured on vintage ‘50s kinescopes, those youngsters represent a TV face (albeit made up, regrettably, of only white faces) of the surging boomer generation.

Then, on Jan. 19, 1953, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo celebrated the birth of a son on “I Love Lucy” — the same day the sitcom’s star, Lucille Ball, gave birth to a son with her real-life husband and leading man, Desi Arnaz.

This couple’s fact-and-fiction child took his place as “the crown prince of the television generation and baby boomers,” says Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture, with infant Desi, Jr., soon “anointed on the cover of the first TV Guide.”

Today, more than a half-century later, the TV experience isn’t nearly so much about viewing as immersion. It doesn’t just bring the world to the audience, it IS the world. As TV merges with the natural world, it also continues to merge with other screened devices, further increasing its presence.

So where does this leave aging boomers? They may still recall a TV universe of only three or four channels on a TV screen, when the viewer had to walk to the set to change channels.

TV is getting older, too. But unlike boomers, it enjoys constant renewal.

Growing up together, TV and baby boomers were a perfect fit – Lincoln Journal Star

NEW YORK (AP) — Unlike baby boomers, television has no birth certificate.

TV’s arrival, depending on how you see it, can be marked at any of a number of moments in the last century.

Maybe 1927, when 21-year-old Philo Farnsworth transmitted the image of a horizontal line to a receiver in the next room of his San Francisco lab.

Or maybe 1939, when the RCA Television Pavilion opened at the New York World’s Fair with the exciting news that RCA’s National Broadcasting Co. would expand from radio into TV, and, to spread the word, telecast the ceremony to the scattering of 2,000 TV sets throughout all of New York City.

But the handiest year for TV’s genesis is 1946 — when technology, optimism and renewed consumer buying power joined forces at World War II’s conclusion and gave broadcast television a belated kick-start.

By chance (or is it?), the same year that ushered in the TV age is also seen as the kickoff for the baby-boom generation — the population boom of kids born between 1946 and 1964.

TV was key to the world baby boomers were born into: a newly modernized world where every problem (with the possible exception of the Cold War) seemed to point to a solution that was just around the corner. Polio would be cured! Man would go into space! Electricity, thanks to atomic energy, would soon be “too cheap to meter.” Even African-Americans, oppressed for so long, had new reason for hope.

The UNIVAC computer, introduced in 1951, would count the U.S. population and forecast Dwight D. Eisenhower’s 1952 presidential win. It could even help volunteers find love and marriage, as TV host Art Linkletter demonstrated on his 1950s game show, “People Are Funny.”

TV chronicled this bracing wave of wonder and potential, and built upon it as an essential part of what set boomers apart: They were pampered and privileged and groomed for a sure-to-be-glorious tomorrow.

No wonder kids claimed TV as their own. No wonder TV eagerly returned the favor, singling them out as an irresistible demographic.

Granted, there wasn’t much prime-time network programming in the fall of 1946, and what there was seemed targeted to adults (including Gillette-sponsored sports every Friday on NBC and, on the DuMont network every Wednesday, TV’s first soap opera).

But kids were squarely in the sights of TV programmers by December 1947, when “Howdy Doody” premiered on NBC as a weekday children’s show. Set in fictional Doodyville, where stringed puppets cavorted with its flesh-and-blood host, “Buffalo Bob” Smith, “Howdy Doody” during its 13-year run would prove to be a huge hit, and much more: a formative influence on nearly every baby boomer’s childhood.

For a glimpse of early boomers, check YouTube for archived clips of “Howdy Doody,” which welcomed kids to the Peanut Gallery, the name it coined for its studio audience. Captured on vintage ’50s kinescopes, those youngsters represent a TV face (albeit made up, regrettably, of only white faces) of the surging boomer generation.

Then, on Jan. 19, 1953, Lucy and Ricky Ricardo celebrated the birth of a son on “I Love Lucy” — the same day the sitcom’s star, Lucille Ball, gave birth to a son with her real-life husband and leading man, Desi Arnaz.

This couple’s fact-and-fiction child took his place as “the crown prince of the television generation and baby boomers,” says Robert Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Bleier Center for Television and Popular Culture, with infant Desi, Jr., soon “anointed on the cover of the first TV Guide.”

Thus did TV and the boomers grow up together. And as the nation overall embraced television’s early offerings, such as Milton Berle’s comedy revue, Ed Sullivan’s variety hour and “Lucy,” youngsters realized they had a special bond with TV.

That is, they could use it as an embryonic form of rebellion against their elders, years before the campus unrest with which their generation would become identified. Those children innately understood that television, despite being welcomed into every living room, wasn’t “good” for them. This made watching TV all the more appealing as they fought their parents’ constant pleas to “go outside and play.”

Today, more than a half-century later, the TV experience isn’t nearly so much about viewing as immersion. It doesn’t just bring the world to the audience, it IS the world. As TV merges with the natural world, it also continues to merge with other screened devices, further increasing its presence.

So where does this leave aging boomers? They may still recall a TV universe of only three or four channels on a TV screen, when the viewer had to walk to the set to change channels.

It’s been a long time since TV consecrated boomer teens with a daily rock-and-roll dance show, “American Bandstand.” With that, its host, Dick Clark, is said to have “created youth culture.”

Boomers, the pioneering swath of youth culture, this year observe birthdays ranging from 52 to 70.

TV is getting older, too. But unlike boomers, it enjoys constant renewal. It never looks its age, whatever that may be.

Pros And Cons Of Multi-Generational Housing

Can You Be Happy With Multi-Generational Housing?

Multi-generational housing is absolutely nothing new. It simply means that multiple generations of the same family decide to live together. Of course, it is very common for parents to live with minor aged children. This term refers to the less common situation when adult children live with parents and, sometimes, grandparents. Sometimes those adult children have their own minor children. This means that three or four generations of the same family could live together in the same home.

Combining families has become more and more trendy. In fact, it has become so popular that a new term has even been coined for it. Baby boomers, who may live with elderly parents and/or adult children, are called the boomerang generation. Actually, it may be the younger and older generations who are doing more of the moving in though.

Families may decide to combine households for lots of reasons. The most obvious reason is probably financial. Living together can be a great way to economize. It may help some family members save money or get back on their feet. Other times, some family members may need more help caring for themselves. Working parents may get child care help from retired family members. Elderly people may need assistance with some daily living activities. Sometimes, living with a family can provide companionship, and it is simply a remedy for loneliness.

Is the boomerang movement positive?

Actually, there are a lot of good reasons for families to live together. Companionship, economy, and child or elder care are a few of the best. If you look into the history of many other cultures, multi-generational housing was normal. It may be that our society’s tendency to move off and live alone is odder.

Do families ever have problems combining households?

Are there every problems when more than one generation lives in the same home? Actually, that is like asking if families ever have problems. If your kids move back in, you may remember why you were so relieved when they went out into the world in the first place. Your elderly parents may have trouble adapting to living in a household where they are no longer the bosses. Hopefully, you can over come these issues, but you are probably prudent to expect some rough times.

It is very important to make sure everybody understands their rights and responsibilities if you choose to combine households. Grandma has the right to get to sleep without listening to the kid’s music blaring at odd hours. On the other hand, young children do need a pleasant and safe place to play sometimes. Your adult children should become responsible about cleaning up after themselves. When they were you, you may have expected to find dirty laundry or dirty dishes in unexpected places. If they return home as adults, you need to make it clear that the rules have changed.

Is Combining Households A Good Idea For You?

I have known many families who enjoyed taking in adult kids, grand-children, and elderly parents. On the other hand, I have also seen situations where one party took advantage of another and things did not work out so well. I think that having clear expectations and open communication helped the successful families a lot.

Self-driving vehicles and Baby Boomers: A budding relationship … – ZDNet

baby-boomer-autonomous-car-senior-driving.jpg

Getty Images/iStockphoto

Automakers and regulators have proclaimed that self-driving vehicles could revolutionize mobility for the elderly. President Obama wrote in a September Op-Ed, “Right now, for too many senior citizens and Americans with disabilities, driving isn’t an option. Automated vehicles could change their lives.” Older folks aren’t exactly known for embracing new technology, but self-driving vehicles just might be an exception to the rule.

There is a clear need for making transportation more accessible for seniors. As we age, many older people have to transition from drivers to passengers because health issues make it unsafe or physically impossible to drive. Whether the reason is cognitive (such as memory loss) or physical (poor vision), the end result is the same: giving up driving takes away a person’s independence.

Driverless cars could solve this problem, but the very same people who could benefit the most from this new technology are the least comfortable with it. Today, Baby Boomers are approximately 50 to 69 years old, but by the time that self-driving cars are on the market, many of them will be faced with normal signs of aging — changes in visibility, flexibility, and range of motion – that make driving difficult or even impossible.

A new survey by Kelley Blue Book found that only one percent of Baby Boomers reported that they “know a lot about autonomous vehicles.” In comparison, younger generations were much more confident about self-driving cars, with most Millenials and pre-driving Gen Z respondents saying they felt safe with Level 5 full vehicle autonomy.

However, aging expert Jodi Olshevski says, “It’s important for us to realize that just because a person is older doesn’t mean that they’re not interested and willing to adopt technology. They might be at a little different rate than some of the younger generations, but I think that’s just a result of exposure and awareness, and comfortability with the technology.”

We spoke with Olshevski to get her take on autonomous vehicle technology. As Gerontologist and Executive Director of the Hartford Center for Mature Market Excellence (“The Hartford”), she has led several studies on vehicle technology among drivers over the age of 50.

In 2015, Olshevski and her colleagues showed a group of Baby Boomers videos of a self-driving car to gauge their level of interest in adopting the technology. Surprisingly, a whole 70 percent of people said they would be willing to test drive an autonomous vehicle. Only 31 percent said they would purchase a self-driving car, but nearly half (38 percent) of Boomers said that if their health prevented them from driving they would consider purchasing one. Olshevski says:

The interest in the technology is increasing almost exponentially among this segment. Of course when you compare them to other generations I think what you find is very similar to tech in general, and that is that people who are older have just had less exposure to the technology so it might take them a little longer to adopt.

Educating drivers about autonomous vehicles will be essential as the technology is rolled out to the public. The Hartford is partnering with AARP (American Association of Retired Persons) to develop a driver safety program that will focus on teaching seniors about the newest vehicle technology.

The AARPs driver safety program is shifting the technology portion of the course from safety features such as antilock brakes to the newest technologies, such as partially automated vehicles (e.g. lane assistance, smart headlights). They are also starting to look at how the program could start getting older adults acquainted with the autonomous vehicles that are likely to be available in the near future.

Jana Lynott, a transportation policy advisor with AARP, says that even though older generations are less familiar and less comfortable with autonomous vehicle technology, Boomers are also the most mobile generation that we’ve ever seen. She published a paper describing how the Baby Boom Generation fueled a historic growth in travel, and she tells us, “They’ve really been transformational across their lifespan of becoming the generation that has increased the number of miles driven, increased the number of trips taken.” She continued:

So, given how important mobility has been to this generation of Boomers, I think that as they begin to outlive their safe driving years, they may be open to looking at other ways of getting around the community in order to keep a high level of mobility. I just think they’re used to being on the go, and they’re not going change that just because they’re getting older and may not drive.

State and federal regulators are starting to put together policies for autonomous vehicles that could lead a transportation revolution. As this happens, Lynott cautions that policy makers should think about how to solve some of the problems with our current transportation system, such as equity and accessibility. She says, “I think there are opportunities to correct some of the deficiencies of the past.”

If You Think Your Life Is Flying By, You're Probably Doing Something Right

Sometimes is just seems like life is flying by. Before you know it, it's Friday again. Maybe it's a function of having a big family, or maybe it's just the phase we're going through. For some reason, I expected it to be different.

They say that when you hit age 40, you're over the hill. So I guess being two decades past that, I must be slipping down that slope at a pretty good clip. When I was younger, I wondered if it would slow down some, you know, as the hair thinned and the knees creaked as much as my rocking chair. But no!

Which brings me to our youngest child's graduation. Yeah, The Joanster, little Joansie, Joana Wee, has finished high school with flying colors and is soon to be a Tiger. Our baby is a woman!

How did this happen, all of a sudden? Was not it just the other day she put on her sisters two-piece, plucked the resident cards from the junk drawer and strolled 3 blocks down to the local pool. At two years old. Jill came home and said, "Hey, where's Joanie?" Did we panic? Is the Pope German? Running along Halls Ferry like we were on fire, pleading with people walking their dogs, hearts constricted like the Grinch's. Thank God the life guards knew us and did not turn us into Social Services.

Then there's the next one up. Mary Pat is marrying in November. Huh? Little MP, the kid who regularly donned pink snow boots and stocking cap to watch TV … in June. The athlete who should have never been allowed to run cross country, since her face always turned redder than Mark McGuire's before Congress. THAT Mary Pat?

And did I mention the wifey is retiring. Wait just a minute here, sports fans. I got four years on her! Just kidding, since she has fought the good fight for a long time, and is definitely in line for this move.

The flip side of all these significant events, once you get past the amazement and the tears and the "Huh? 'S", is that me and that retired lady will be empty-nesters in a couple of months. The recent grad thinks that maybe we're being a bit too giddy about this prospect, even as she "stresses out" about moving on and out. And maybe we are, but it is hard to contain our glee. It feels like a long, slow, deep breath, followed by a smile of gratitude, and accomplishment. Theirs, and ours, really. Just a memory are the years of doing the happy dance after finding a dollar in the dryer, or cashing in the coin jar to get milk and formula. Gone but not forgotten are the long nights of wondering if one child would ever stop throwing up, or another would ever get home, or still another would ever find their path.

At 60, I guess I've put in a good 75% of my allotted time. A glance at my own high school classlist shows a few who can not say that. So, trust me, I'm not complaining.

But maybe I need to borrow a line from Captain James Kirk of the Starship Enterprise if things are going stay at this warp speed.

"Scottie, I need more power!"

(From "A BOOMER'S JOURNAL", by Tom Anselm SUBURBAN JOURNALS OF ST. LOUIS, MO. MAY 2009)