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Del Webb community at Trinity Falls celebrates grand opening

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Del Webb, one of the nation’s leading builders of active adult communities, is celebrating the grand opening of its Trinity Falls community from 1 to 5 p.m. on Sept. 21 in McKinney.

Del Webb at Trinity Falls is the company’s third 55-plus community in the Dallas-Fort Worth area.

Prospective residents can get a taste of the signature Del Webb lifestyle with light bites from Eddie Deen Catering, drinks, live music and a “dream vacation” giveaway.

Six new decorator-furnished models will be available for touring. The model park is at 901 Cormorant Drive in McKinney.

Located in the award-winning master-planned community of Trinity Falls, this Del Webb community includes 530-plus homesites and 126 acres with extensive walking trails and open green spaces. A future 10,000-square-foot amenity complex will have a clubhouse and an outdoor recreation area.

“We have experienced overwhelming interest in Del Webb at Trinity Falls, and we are thrilled to be celebrating the official grand opening,” said Bryan Swindell, president of the company’s Dallas division.

“This community has exceptional amenities and beautiful natural surroundings. I know our homeowners will love it here.”

Baby boomers and empty nesters will have their choice of 10 designs featuring one-story living with 1,300 to 2,600-plus square feet of living space, two or three bedrooms and spacious open living areas. New home pricing starts in the $240s.

“Variety is what these floor plans offer, whether you’re downsizing from your existing residence or wishing for a spacious home great for entertaining with a large kitchen,” said Swindell.

Appointments are available for those interested in learning more about Del Webb at Trinity Falls. To schedule your appointment, call 888-672-8179. Visit delwebb.com/trinityfalls and join the VIP Interest List to receive updates about the community.

Del Webb – a national brand of PulteGroup Inc. – is a pioneer in active adult communities and a leading builder of new homes targeted to pre-retirement and retiring boomers.

For more information, visit www.delwebb.com.

Climate strikes see students worldwide demand action: Live updates

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Greta Thunberg.
Greta Thunberg. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP/Getty Images

At certain points in history, when institutions and established leaders have failed to step up and take action, it falls to the youngest among us to take charge. That is happening again these two weeks as a 16-year-old girl from Sweden, Greta Thunberg, takes center stage to mobilize the world against climate change.

Those of us who are older are reminded how young Americans rose up more than 50 years ago in the Civil Rights era. In May 1963, more than 1,000 young people in Birmingham, Alabama, marched through the city to call attention to racial injustice.

When many of the children marched again the next day, the notoriously racist sheriff Bull Connor set vicious police dogs on them. The children were under attack — by the dogs, clubs, fire hoses, and whatever means deemed necessary by the police. The television pictures that night sickened the nation.

The violence continued until the Department of Justice stepped in and the marches came to an end. But even as the marches stopped, the impact of the Birmingham Children’s Crusade continued to be felt.

The crusade offered moral clarity to the nation and proved pivotal in swaying President John F. Kennedy and Americans everywhere to urgently confront the need for racial justice.

We are at yet another moment in which the voice and efforts of the young are needed. The Baby Boomers and Gen Xers in power have proven unable to take action on a multitude of issues recently.

But nowhere is their inaction more glaring than on the issues that threaten the safety of people everywhere and especially millennials and members of Generation Z: first guns and now climate change.

David Gergen is a CNN senior political analyst and professor of public leadership at the Harvard Kennedy School, where he founded the Center for Public Leadership. James Piltch is Gergen’s chief research assistant. His writing on civic life and education has appeared in The Washington Post, The Boston Globe, and The Chronicle of Higher Education. Read more of their opinion piece here.

For Baby Boomers – A Car is a Luxury That They Can Do Without!

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Yes, that is true depending on just where you live, and where you work, and how you and your family uses the family car …

Many have talked about the price of gas in Western Europe and how much more it is in comparison with that of the US, but they do not tell you about other options they have for transportation. If you look at the size of a Western Europe and at the size of our New England states you will find that they are both about the same. Also, you will find that both have good transportation sources. Now look at most of the states west of the Mississippi and you will find a different transportation requirement. If you live in place like Montana, Idaho, North and South Dakota you will definitely have a different need for your car or truck.

Baby Boomers have definitely come to a crossroads in this country when it comes to our vAhicles, car specifically. With the price of gas, and the impact that it is having on us all, boomers need to think about our transportation requirements. We can buy a new car with better gas mileage and greater reliability. Or we can buy a used car with fewer miles on it and possibly greater reliability than the car that we are driving.

Boomers, would it surprise you to know that most of the car on the road today has better than 80,000 miles on the odometer and are better than 9 years old? It seem that American's are keeping they car longer then ever before. Now there are still are a number of Baby Boomers driving gas guzzlers. There are a number of factors that play into the reason for keeping the vehicle so long, but two definite reasons are price or expense of a new car, and the price of gas.

Buying a new car is out of the question, the main reason is the expense of having to make car payments for the next three years plus. Add to that the new car depreciation going out the door of the dealership. You could buy a used car. You have read the ads reading "used cars for sale", and you have seen the vehicle setting in someones front lawn indicating "used car for sale by owner". According to the National Automobile Dealers Association "it's important to buy a used car with a reputation for solid dependability, it's even smarter to buy a used car that is less popular with consumers, meaning it has depreciated more rapidly".

Consider domestic brands Ford, Chevrolet and Dodge. The reliability of US autos have improved within the last 10 years. Think about these brands that are getting high scores for reliability; and can save you quite a few dollars when it come to parts and repair in the future. Remember when looking for used models, the domestics can cost much less for a very similar product, making them when worth a check-out. You might want to know that Consumer Reports routinely grades the domestic premium brands as among the most reliable cars in the world. It should be noted that you should have the used vehicle checked out by a third party mechanic. Uses your local Crag's or Angie's list to provide this service. Even better Google "Used Car Certified Mechanic" for your local area or state.

As of today June 24, 2008 at the Moto Mart in Freeburg, IL (A quite suburb, Baby Boomers community, 30 miles east of St Louis) a gallon of reg gas is $ 4.13 a gallon. Now what idiot in his or her right mind would pay these high gas prices? That would be anyone trying to get to work or run a family an even a retiree. No one knows what gas prices will be a year from now. No one knows just how much of the family budget dollar will be eaten up by the price of fuel. An if you are on a fixed income the high gas prices are even worst.

One way that you could possible decrease the price of gas is to increase your gas mileage. Use a Hydrogen Generator to run your car on a mixture of both Gas and Water. Water electrolysis is the basis of this technology, and has been around since 1803. The Idea using water fuel has been in existence since that 1990's. Thousands or people have converted their cars to run on water and are achieving amazing results.

Before you put this out with the trash think of this. None of the above information on buying a car is necessary. Your car is not the problem, it is the cost of fuel and not knowing how much it will cost in the future. That is your main problem. Google for the information on Hydrogen Generator (HHO Car Kits) or for using water for fuel. Just read the information and check out the bulletin Boards. An excellent way to try the system is to get together with a friend, buy one those cheap used cars and install the system. Then run the car to see if it works … I know you can't teach old dogs new tricks!

Put this information in the back of you mind until the tough times hit …

The purpose of a car is not to get you from point A to point B. The purpose of a car is to get you from point A to point A and any points in between. Oh no! Where does your car set most of the time?

Again, Thank you for your time.

Baby boomers fail at investing by avoiding bonds

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Baby boomers, man.

Before I begin, a good rule of thumb for anything I write: Don’t take anything personally. Here we go: Baby boomers are the worst investors in the world.

I have seen it with my own two eyes. They got gorked up on dot-com stocks in 1999, then got rinsed. They got gorked up on stocks again in 2007, then got rinsed.

They are gorked up on stocks again. Have you ever tried talking to a baby boomer about their asset allocation?

Hey, Dad… uh, you’re getting close to retirement. Don’t you think you should lighten up on stocks?

We all know how that conversation goes. Not well. Especially with cable news turned up to 11 in the background.

The rule of thumb

In the old days, they had this rule of thumb that your age should be your percentage allocation to bonds. So if you were 70 years old, you should have a 70% allocation to bonds.

The reason is simple: When you’re close to retirement, you don’t want to risk losing it all. You want something safe, something that spits out some income.

In my travels, I would say that the average baby boomer has an 80%-90% allocation to stocks. When the sane, sober generation Xers try to have a conversation about de-risking, they get told to beat it.

For whatever reason, baby boomers have an insane tolerance for risk. And it has not served them well. They are wealthy, but they could have been wealthier.

They are credulous. If a bubble pops up, they believe in it, and dive in head first, whether it’s cannabis or dot-com or security stocks. Not bitcoin

BTCUSD, -3.35%

 — that posed a technological hurdle they could not overcome.

Ironically, the one bull market they have not been sucked into is bonds. Which is the one thing they should have been investing in all along.

Boomers and bonds

Bonds are for old people — although not just for old people — and yet old people don’t want them.

A little louder, for the Tommy Bahama shirts in the back: If the stock market crashes, you are all screwed. Pretend you have $2 million saved for retirement. In 2008, the stock market went down nearly 60%.

If the stock market goes down 60% again, you will have $800,000, which will drastically reduce your standard of living in retirement.

Theoretically this would get your attention, but it probably doesn’t because you don’t think it’s possible that the stock market would go down 60% again.

You’re right. It might go down more than 60%. There is precedent for that, too.

This is why stocks are unsuitable for all different kinds of people — they make sense for people in their 20s and 30s and also 40s, but as you get older you have to cut risk dramatically.

This used to be the conventional wisdom. Not anymore. What happened?

What happened was an 11-year bull market. There are lots of investors whose investing career has not spanned a full cycle. Only the first half of the cycle, which is less instructive than the second half.

Boomers have been through a bunch of cycles and, as a cohort, have learned precisely zero lessons from them.

But what about low rates?

I get asked this all the time, so I will answer this question one more time …

“Why invest in bonds when interest rates are so low — when it’s clearly a bubble?”

1. Stocks are a bubble, and yet you invest in those.

2. Believe it or not, interest rates can go lower, and probably will.

But most of all …

3. Bonds provide diversification.

Stocks may have gone down almost 60% from 2007-2009, but a 35/65 portfolio of stocks and bonds only went down 24%.

That fact remains relevant whether you believe bonds are “in a bubble” or not. I have a bit more to say on this, which I will send to you tomorrow.

Here’s the thing: Financial markets simply aren’t fair. They’re not fair to normal human beings with normal human emotions, people who get excited by high prices and demoralized by low prices.

A humblebrag: Whether because of genetics or study or whatever, I have been blessed with the ability to do the opposite: I get excited by low prices and demoralized by high prices.

Financial advisers

Many financial advisers (lots of them CFAs and CFPs) are motivated by one thing and one thing only: retaining assets. Before any financial advisers get angry here, I’ll refer you back to my earlier rule of thumb: Don’t take anything I write personally.

Anyway, the worst-case scenario for advisers is that you pull your account. Most people don’t pull their accounts when they lose money — it is easy for the adviser to shift blame to the market. They pull their accounts when they don’t make as much money as everyone else.

If you went to your adviser and asked to shift your asset allocation to bonds, he or she is going to put up a massive fight. Because your expected return will drop, and you won’t make as much money as “everyone else.” If you’re all in stocks, and you lose money, well, so will everyone else.

That is a fight you might not win. If you told him about this guy on the internet yammering on about bonds, he would probably tell you that I am a crank.

Financial advisers are many things — relationship managers, mainly — but the majority of them are not market experts. His opinion is no better or worse than the person on CNBC.

I have a strong suspicion that very few baby boomers will take my advice. Because, you know, baby boomers.

It’s not about my giant ego. I try to prevent unnecessary misery. How am I doing?

I give myself a D+.

Jared Dillian is an investment strategist at Mauldin Economics and a former head of ETF trading at Lehman Brothers. Subscribe to his weekly investment newsletter, The 10th Man.

Why Do Baby Boomers Give Advice

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Cappy tries to explain why boomers give advice.
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Baby Boomers Generation, Part 2

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The number of newborns in the US was approximately 2.5 or higher per year during the l930's and l940's. In l945, that number grew to 3.47 million in the first year of the Baby Boom. The oldest baby boomer will turn 65 this year. Presidents Bill Clinton and George Bush were born during this year. This birth increase led to consumer demand for homes, cars and services In the book entitled The New Retirement Surve Ken Dychtwald, Ph.D. performed a survey that was conducted in a news release from Merrill Lynch.

The news release stated that approximately 76% of boomers planned to keep working and be able to save for retirement, but wanted to change their job environment at about age 64. "Since baby boomers were living longer, they were creating a entirely new stage of life. They were motivated by prestige and accomplishment and relished a long work week. They had sacrificed a lot to get where they were, becoming known as the workaholic generation. They believed that Generation X and Generation Y needed to "pay their dues and work hard "like they did.

They were goal-oriented and competitive, clever, resourceful and want to "win." They had been given educational and financial opportunities from previous generations, While older generations were taught "not to speak out." baby boomers were able to speak out as in the Viet Nam Protests. The world was going to change and every generation, prior to the one they were born into, had to "keep up" and seek to understand future generations.

Boomers were three times more likely to be concerned with illness and how to pay for healthcare; even more concerned with this and ending up in a nursing home than death!

The women in the baby boomer generation became more educated and thus more independent, wanted to take responsibility for home and work challenges. They viewed this as liberation and opportunity for career development and personal growth. In the retirement survey, married boomer women wanted to be helpful in sharing responsibility for their families in comparison to their parents. As compared to that of their parents. (33% versus 5%) The men wanted to work less and take it easy more in order to spend time with their wife's. Financial freedom seemed the most important variable for when they would retire.

They were aware of the uncertainty of government entitlements, such as Social Security and had a need to prepare themselves for their future and the future of their offspring. The most common ideal work environment that baby boomers preferred was to have equal time between work and play. It seemed that Baby Boomers were not concerned with just money. About 37% in the survey said that bringing in earnings was important, more than double. They were just as concerned with receiving mental stimulation and challenge their minds. This began the "we" generation. Apparently, Baby Boomers are ten times more likely to put others first.

LinkedIn Just Added A New Way To Showcase Your Skills

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Hiring, skill assessment

Standing out in a crowd.

Getty

LinkedIn’s newest change is one that many people might overlook. That is a mistake. Hiring managers and recruiters are paying attention to this new change, so you need to be too. 

Baby Boomers have created a LinkedIn profile that may have lots of skill endorsements, but LinkedIn is now taking it all a step further with their Skills Assessment. 

According to new LinkedIn research, more than 76% of professionals wish there was a way for hiring managers to verify their skills so they could stand out amongst other candidates. 

As a Baby Boomer, you now have a way to validate your technical skills. These will make you stand out to recruiters and dismiss the myth that Boomers aren’t as technically gifted as younger workers. Of course, if you are like me where you have more specialized industry or soft skills, then you won’t benefit much as I don’t write programming code and I’m not an ace on Excel either. LinkedIn says they are working on the non-tech skills assessment so I’ll be sure to make you aware when they come up. 

The new feature called Skills Assessments is short, multiple-choice tests that users can take to verify their knowledge in areas like computer languages, software packages, and other technical work-related skills. If you have any of these strengths, you can take a skill assessment and if you pass you get a badge to add to your profile. This will appear as a button in the skills and endorsements area of your profile.

These assessments were created by professionals who are subject area experts already working with LinkedIn, such as those folks who create content for LinkedIn Learning.

Ken, 56, is a technical director for a large Insurance company. We were working on creating his LinkedIn Profile, and I asked if he wanted to bring extra attention to his coding skills. These are skills recruiters seek so Ken plans to take the skills assessments and if he passes (earning a 70% or higher) he’ll get a badge for his profile use. I mentioned that since he has coding skills, he might want to emphasize these in this new way. These tests measure your knowledge in specific areas, in his case C++, Java, and MS Project. When he passes, he gets a badge that can broadcast to any employer who is looking for people with those skills. The skill assessment is an honor system when taking the tests, but LinkedIn assumes most people will be honest and take the test themselves and not look up answers on the Internet. 

What if you fail? Not a problem. No one knows. You have three months to wait before retaking it. LinkedIn will try to upsell you. You will get offered LinkedIn Learning classes to improve your skills. If you have a library card, check to see if you have free access to Lynda.com which is now also called LinkedIn Learning. That way you can brush up on classes at no charge. 

For those who pass, they will need to retake tests every year to keep their badges and credentials up to date. 

Here is the list of skills they have assessments for: 

Skill Assessment List

· Angular· AWS · Bash · C · C#· C++· CSS · GIT· Hadoop · HTML · Java· JavaScript· jQuery · JSON · Maven · MongoDB · NodeJs · Objective-C · PHP · Python · Ruby · Ruby on Rails · Scala · Swift · WordPress · XML · Adobe Acrobat · MS Excel · MS PowerPoint · MS Project · MS SharePoint · MS Visio · QuickBooks 

Advertise your skills

Scroll to the skill section of your profile and select one of the available Skill Assessments you’d like to take. Any results are kept private to you, and if you pass, you will have the option to add a “verified skill” badge to your profile. If you don’t pass, you have complete control over the visibility of the results and can brush up on your skills so you can pass the next time. When you’ve passed an assessment for an in-demand skill, LinkedIn will also send you relevant job recommendations as soon as they are posted.

It’s a new trend moving towards skill-based hiring where LinkedIn hopes to play a significant role. 83% of hiring managers agree that skills and credentialing are becoming more critical for hiring talent. However, 77% of hiring managers agree that it’s hard to know what skills candidates possess without a skill assessment. Recruiters and hiring managers can utilize this new Skill Assessment tool to more effectively pinpoint which candidates are a good match based on proven skills.

LinkedIn Skill Assessments will be ramping to all English speaking members globally over the next few months on both Mobile and Desktop versions.

“>

LinkedIn’s newest change is one that many people might overlook. That is a mistake. Hiring managers and recruiters are paying attention to this new change, so you need to be too. 

Baby Boomers have created a LinkedIn profile that may have lots of skill endorsements, but LinkedIn is now taking it all a step further with their Skills Assessment. 

According to new LinkedIn research, more than 76% of professionals wish there was a way for hiring managers to verify their skills so they could stand out amongst other candidates. 

As a Baby Boomer, you now have a way to validate your technical skills. These will make you stand out to recruiters and dismiss the myth that Boomers aren’t as technically gifted as younger workers. Of course, if you are like me where you have more specialized industry or soft skills, then you won’t benefit much as I don’t write programming code and I’m not an ace on Excel either. LinkedIn says they are working on the non-tech skills assessment so I’ll be sure to make you aware when they come up. 

The new feature called Skills Assessments is short, multiple-choice tests that users can take to verify their knowledge in areas like computer languages, software packages, and other technical work-related skills. If you have any of these strengths, you can take a skill assessment and if you pass you get a badge to add to your profile. This will appear as a button in the skills and endorsements area of your profile.

These assessments were created by professionals who are subject area experts already working with LinkedIn, such as those folks who create content for LinkedIn Learning.

Ken, 56, is a technical director for a large Insurance company. We were working on creating his LinkedIn Profile, and I asked if he wanted to bring extra attention to his coding skills. These are skills recruiters seek so Ken plans to take the skills assessments and if he passes (earning a 70% or higher) he’ll get a badge for his profile use. I mentioned that since he has coding skills, he might want to emphasize these in this new way. These tests measure your knowledge in specific areas, in his case C++, Java, and MS Project. When he passes, he gets a badge that can broadcast to any employer who is looking for people with those skills. The skill assessment is an honor system when taking the tests, but LinkedIn assumes most people will be honest and take the test themselves and not look up answers on the Internet. 

What if you fail? Not a problem. No one knows. You have three months to wait before retaking it. LinkedIn will try to upsell you. You will get offered LinkedIn Learning classes to improve your skills. If you have a library card, check to see if you have free access to Lynda.com which is now also called LinkedIn Learning. That way you can brush up on classes at no charge. 

For those who pass, they will need to retake tests every year to keep their badges and credentials up to date. 

Here is the list of skills they have assessments for: 

Skill Assessment List

· Angular· AWS · Bash · C · C#· C++· CSS · GIT· Hadoop · HTML · Java· JavaScript· jQuery · JSON · Maven · MongoDB · NodeJs · Objective-C · PHP · Python · Ruby · Ruby on Rails · Scala · Swift · WordPress · XML · Adobe Acrobat · MS Excel · MS PowerPoint · MS Project · MS SharePoint · MS Visio · QuickBooks 

Advertise your skills

Scroll to the skill section of your profile and select one of the available Skill Assessments you’d like to take. Any results are kept private to you, and if you pass, you will have the option to add a “verified skill” badge to your profile. If you don’t pass, you have complete control over the visibility of the results and can brush up on your skills so you can pass the next time. When you’ve passed an assessment for an in-demand skill, LinkedIn will also send you relevant job recommendations as soon as they are posted.

It’s a new trend moving towards skill-based hiring where LinkedIn hopes to play a significant role. 83% of hiring managers agree that skills and credentialing are becoming more critical for hiring talent. However, 77% of hiring managers agree that it’s hard to know what skills candidates possess without a skill assessment. Recruiters and hiring managers can utilize this new Skill Assessment tool to more effectively pinpoint which candidates are a good match based on proven skills.

LinkedIn Skill Assessments will be ramping to all English speaking members globally over the next few months on both Mobile and Desktop versions.

Watch me Work | Acrylic Nails Baby Boomer Coffin Acrylic Nails on Small Nail Beds

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Baby Boomers – Unstoppable Market That is Cashed Up and Ready to Spend!

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One of the keys of generating wealth is discovering market trends and market opportunities that can be acted upon. While it is not always important to be the first to discover the wealth making opportunities, it is important to take advantage of them in the best possible ways. One of the largest market segments currently within the US is the Baby Boomer generation.

Baby Boomer is a term that refers to a person born between the years of 1946 -1964. There are approximately 76 million Baby Boomers within the US alone, presenting a tremendous opportunity for business owners and entrepreneurs.

Here are some ideas on how to take advantage of the market:

# Health Care

As this large market segment ages, one of their primary concerns is and will be health care. Access to quality, affordable health care will be a top priority for many Baby Boomers. Working in or starting a business within the health care field is one of the primary ways to profit from the Baby Boomer opportunity. For example, senior care consultants, health care facilities, long term care facilities and wellness centers are possible considerations.

# Health and Fitness

In addition to traditional health care, the Baby Boomer market is also interested in alternative forms of health and nutrition. Supplements, natural solutions and diet considerations tailored for this market segment are viable possibilities to consider for revenue generation. Websites offering this information are also possibilities for generating online revenue from products and services, ads or even affiliate marketing when they provide strong information to the Baby Boomer market.

# Financial Services

As the Baby Boomer generation continues to age, one of their primary concerns in addition to health care is financial planning. As individuals are living longer and retiring early, it is more important than ever to protect assets and generate income for the duration of an individual's life. Businesses within the financial field or insurance field are in demand for this age demographic and anything related to the field presents viable business opportunities.

# Travel

A common hobby for retirees is to travel. Travel services both offline and online are possible considerations for revenue generating ideas to target to this market. In addition to travel related services, travel amenities or even accessories are also possibilities. For example, you may offer special luggage or luggage tags, or even specialized packages that are marketed directly to Baby Boomers.

# Volunteer or Fundraising Possibilities

The Baby Boomer generation is fond of volunteering for a variety of causes. So, products or services that donate money to non-profit causes would be a great consideration. While almost any cause is a great opportunity, selecting the most popular organizations or causes to donate for will allow you to have additional visibility for your business efforts.

Also, travel services that organize volunteer vacations either domestically or abroad could be possibilities. Many Baby Boomers are looking to combine their leisure activities with raising money or doing something for those who are less fortunate.

# Vintage Products

Baby Boomers are often fond of items that remind them of their past, or even the time era of their parents. Selling those exact products or products that resemble those brands is an excellent way to profit from this demographic.

# Teaching

Baby Boomers are considered to be a generation of Do'ers. So, they are more likely to continue learning and trying new things than from other generations. Consider offering classes for scrap booking, learning a foreign language or for cooking, marketed to the Baby Boomer generation. You may be able to do this in local retail stores, or at the local college.

Over 50% of Americans are in the dark about the minimum down payment

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More than half of Americans admitted they do not know the minimum required down payment needed to purchase a home.

The findings of Bankrate’s new research revealed that 51% of Americans have no clue when it comes to a home’s down payment. Twenty-eight percent guessed that the standard recommended amount of 20% or more of the purchase price is needed. Meanwhile, 2% calculated that the minimum requirement is between 0% to 5% of the price, depending on the loan program.

Generally, the respondents’ perceptions indicated that consumers were not entirely aware of the various affordable loan programs, according to Bankrate.

Deborah Kearns, a mortgage analyst at Bankrate, said that 20% of the purchase price is the recommended amount.

“However, many homebuyers don’t realize that conventional loans require just 3% of the purchase price as a down payment and some VA and USDA loans don’t require anything at all,” Kearns said. “Local first-time homebuyer assistance programs can also lower your upfront, out-of-pocket costs substantially at closing.”

Not knowing was only a fraction of the problem. Bankrate also reported that almost half of prospective millennial homebuyers said their cost of living was one of their biggest barriers to buying a home.

Compared to 38% of Gen-Xers and 31% of baby boomers, 45% of prospective millennial buyers could not afford a down payment and closing costs for a home due to the burden of the everyday cost of living.

That is why home older generations were typically faster to save up for a down payment on their first home. Of those who were able to save in under 10 years, baby boomers needed an estimated average of two years and six months, while Gen-Xers took three months longer and millennials four months more.

However, 22% of millennials feared they won’t be able to save enough for a down payment, with 37% of Gen-Xers and 60% of baby boomers feeling the same way.