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The Baby Boomer Effects – Woodstock To Main Street

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In his latest book, Boom, Voices of the Sixties, Tom Brokaw focuses his famous reporting lens on the Sixties decade. Future business and political leaders came of age, and youth energetically began to carve out new rules and new civil rights. The Vietnam War was defining and divisive, rocking the nation and Baby Boomers in particular. Millions protested the war and the draft. A counter culture, and rebellion against societal mores and "the establishment" was reflected in "acid" music and psychedelic art. Woodstock featured great names in music but became a drug fest. LSD was drug blatantly promoted by Sixties guru, Timothy Leary, who convinced young followers to "turn on, tune in, drop out."

Tom Brokaw interviewed Sixties top singer, Judy Collins, now in successful recovery from alcoholism and drug abuse. She recounted that there was a lot of chaos as well as lots of drug addicts and alcoholics in those days. Those who recovered and those who died. Judy herself finally got the treatment she needed in 1978, and has helped many others by telling her story of hope. Brokwaalso profiles a San Francisco doctor, Dr. David Smith, who started and ran the Free Clinic for Haight Ashbury youth who had nowhere to turn for needed medical care. Dr. David Smith took LSD himself.

What happened to Janis Joplin and Jimmy Hendricks was a tragic commentary on the times. Others are in recovery, like singer Grace Slick of the Jefferson Airplanes. Singer-guitarist James Taylor overcame his heroin habit but his marriage to Carly Simon didn't survive. The drug culture was vividly described by Tom Wolff's famous The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test as it follows the trail of Ken Kesey and his "Merry Band of Pranksters, and the Grateful Dead's early" Acid Test "music.

At the same time, most kids who tried pot and grew their hair long later shed both. Baby Boomers went on to become the wealthiest generation ever. Energetic optimistic, individual, entrepreneurial, Boomers nevertheless experienced divorce at a rate off one out of two marriages. It was a youth culture. They felt they would naturally stay young, and remain healthier longer than the precious generation. Looking young has cost Baby Boomers a bundle in plastic surgery and cosmetics, yet what is the illusive definition of attractiveness as we age? To age seems somehow reversible to many in this generation.

We know the incidence of late onset and long-term addiction among those over age 50 is on the rise. Many Baby Boomers are self-medicating for chronic pain, slipping into addiction to pain pills, which they get from "doctor shopping" or the Internet. And many suffer late onset addiction to their earlier drugs of choice. Some never quit heavy drinking and / or drug use.

Baby Boomers understand the value of therapy and self-help. They want choice, and to be engaged in decisions. These factors can help Boomers in successful treatment for those who struggle with alcohol and chemical dependency. Being engaged in one's treatment is key, and an individualized care plan begins with the assessment of the person physically, mentally, emotionally and spiritually, Therapies within a the holistic program are based on the 12-Step philosophy, and may include Motivational Interviewing, and expressive, experiential therapies such as movement, art therapy, writing and music, as well as wellness, nutrition and spirituality. Menopausal and post-menopausal women find Hormonal shift assessment helpful as well. Both men and women renew connection to self and others.

Baby Boomers in recovery are like so many in their generation who are finding renewed purpose in life. They are asking, "What do I want my relationships to be, my work to be? What can I do to make a difference to others and society? What does vitality mean to me?" Exploring healthy aging, even if we use the dreaded word "aging," really is a step towards vitality for those who are on a recovery journey or who want to make meaningful choices in the "second half of life."

Agency on Aging to host Welcome to Medicare presentation in NP | Lifestyles

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You don’t have to navigate Medicare alone.

Those approaching age 65 or who are already 65 and older, and thinking about retirement, are invited to a “Welcome to Medicare” forum, sponsored by West Central Nebraska Agency on Aging and Senior Health Insurance Information Program.

This free workshop will provide basic Medicare information needed to make an informed decision about Medicare coverage, according to a press release.

Welcome to Medicare will begin at 7 p.m. on Sept. 3 at North Platte Public Library, 120 W. Fourth St., in North Platte.

Medicare coverage is nearly universal for Americans 65 and older, yet 57% of baby boomers say they have a “poor understanding” or know “almost nothing” about Medicare, the release said. Three-quarters of boomers do not even know that most Americans pay Medicare premiums, copays and deductibles.

Welcome to Medicare will be presented by Rhonda Godbey, a certified Medicare counselor from Nebraska Senior Health Insurance Information Program. For more information, call Godbey at 308-535-8195.

“With nearly 10,000 baby boomers turning 65 every day, information about Medicare is in high demand. Even people who have had Medicare for years are anxious to get impartial information.” Godbey said. “This presentation is designed for consumers who want to learn more about Medicare in an easy-to-understand format without any sales pressure.”

Nebraska SHIIP is a federally-funded division of the Nebraska Department of Insurance. The program offers free, confidential and unbiased Medicare education and counseling to seniors and disabled Nebraskans. Nebraska SHIIP does not sell or endorse any insurance company or products. For more information about Medicare, contact Nebraska SHIIP at 800-234-7119 or go to doi.nebraska.gov/shiip.

Video: Baby boomers revel at Woodstock 50 years on

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Baby boomers dressed in tie-dye, rolling wheelchairs and chasing a memory of peace and love flocked to Bethel, New York, for the weekend to mark the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, the music festival that defined 1960s counterculture. (Reuters/ Gabriella Borter)

Read the full article here.

(JP/Reuters/AFP)

Baby Boomers Revisit Retirement Expectations

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It is no secret that the "Great Recession" has had a devastating impact on Baby Boomers, especially those among the leading edge of that generation coming up on retirement. Lifetime savings were impacted as the stock market crash drove down 401k's. Home equities vanished and many Boomers suddenly found themselves upside-down on their mortgages rather than having an anticipated nest egg for retirement. So where does the Boomer generation go from here?

A lot depends on their age. The 78 million strong Boomer generation covers a large age span, comprised of births from1946-1964. So while the leading edge is turning sixty-five and may already be retired, the other end of the spectrum has 10-15 years of employment left. Younger Boomers have the time to recover a good portion of their lost assets. Older Boomers, on the other hand, face a darker outlook.

Boomers in their sixties who have suffered financial setbacks have pretty well reconciled themselves that they are never going to fully recover their assets. By some estimates, the housing market will take ten years to fully recover, and even then it is unlikely to return to pre-implosion levels. The stock market has enjoyed a bumpy recover, but Boomers in their sixties are reluctant to put the remainder of their lifetime savings into jeopardy again. At most, a conservative blend of bonds and mutual funds will probably define their diminished portfolios.

For those Baby Boomers who do not have the time to recoup their losses, this is a time of soul searching:

  • Some are attempting to delay retirement if they already have a job. Putting off retirement does add more bucks to the retirement cookie jar, and delaying tapping into Social Security means a bigger allotment down the road. But hanging in there at an existing job is not as easy as it sounds. In many instances, older workers are being pressured to retire or are laid off to make way for less-expensive junior workers coming up through the ranks.
  • Boomers who had already retired or lost their jobs are in dire straits. Many operate home businesses, but the down economy has impacted that as well. And landing a job when you are in your late fifties or early sixties is almost impossible. These are the Boomers who are really hurting, many losing their homes and trying to figure out how to just survive. This is a shell-shocked segment that is suddenly faced with tough decisions after the financial rug has been pulled out from under them.

Older Boomers are going through the process of accepting their fate and making adjustments. Never a generation to wallow in self-pity, these Boomers who raised families, built our economy and fought in the jungles of Vietnam are catching their second breath and developing "what now" strategies.

Most eventually realize that retirement is still possible if they downsize or modify their expectations. That does not mean that they must forego a comfortable retirement. It is simply a matter of surveying what assets are left and determining how those can be optimized to achieve the best possible retirement. For many, this means re-locating to less expensive areas or moving to a foreign country where retirement dollars go further. Some will start businesses or work part-time, never fully retiring. Others will discover that the pleasure of controlling their own time overrides disappointments and preconceived retirement notions, engaging in new activities and volunteerism during their golden years.

One thing is certain, Baby Boomers will enjoy active lifestyles during retirement regardless of their financial circumstances. Despite popular misconceptions, this is not a generation that gives up or focuses on hedonistic pursuits. We are a tough bunch who have overcome life's adversities time and again. And we are not through yet. Just wait – Baby Boomers are picking themselves up and healing their wounds. No matter the state of our retirement, we are going to make more contributions to our country and younger generations than any previous group of senior citizens!

Financial literacy is key to helping millennials get out of debt, experts say

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Jessica Moorhouse said it wasn’t until after university she started to get a handle on her own personal finances. Like many other millennials, she continued to do her banking with the same bank her parents used. 

Moorhouse, who is now a millennial money expert and financial counsellor, began to wonder if she was doing this whole banking thing right. 

That’s when she began to Google questions she didn’t know the answers to, and eventually, she stumbled upon personal finance blogs.

“That was the thing that kind of changed everything for me because then I realized, oh I’m not an idiot for not knowing these answers,” Moorhouse said. 

“This is actually something that everyone has asked themselves and that’s what … opened this world of personal finance to me.”

She said this inspired her to make a career out of it and help other millennials get a handle on their personal finances. 

Moorhouse said banks should focus more on financial literacy and transparency in order to help millennials get out of debt. 

According to a recent Statistics Canada study comparing millennials to the generation that came before them, millennials made more money than gen-Xers did at the same age, but they also owe more too. 

A report from credit reporting agency TransUnion tells a similar tale — millennials are now the generation carrying the second highest amount of total debt, behind gen-X, but ahead of their boomer parents.

Jessica Moorhouse, millennial money expert and financial counsellor, said although she thinks banks should be more transparent and focus on educating their clients about the products they’re selling, consumers have the responsibility to do their own research as well. (Submitted by Jessica Moorhouse)

That’s not a surprise to Moorhouse, whose clientele are primarily millennials.

“A lot of my clients, they come to me, they discuss where they’re banking, and they have no idea that they’re even paying monthly fees,” Moorhouse said.

“How can you not know that? How did someone not explain that properly to you?” 

At the end of the day, Moorhouse said a big part of the problem is that banks are fundamentally selling debt, which many young people don’t fully understand.

“They get a loan or get a credit card or get into some sort of debt product and they don’t really know all the information and I feel like it’s kind of up to the bank to really take responsibility for that.” 

Do your own research outside of the bank

Moorhouse said banks have a responsibility to educate their clients and be more transparent, but she thinks consumers should be proactive and do their own research.

“You can’t just go to one bank and expect to get all the information you need from one person that’s at that bank,” she said.  

“You need to do your own due diligence because it is your money.”

 

We don’t want to just be sold to, we want you to give us actual valuable information.– Jessica Moorhouse, millennial money expert and financial counsellor

Slowly but surely, Moorhouse said, banks are moving in the right direction. 

There are many robo-advisors, discount brokerages and online banks out there that are appealing to younger generations.

Moorhouse said a lot of these companies that have a good online presence are putting a focus on making things more user-friendly and providing customers with financial literacy tools which attract not only millennials but the generation that follows — generation Z — who are even more tech-savvy.

“We don’t want to just be sold to, we want you to give us actual valuable information,” Moorhouse said.

Tech-savvy solutions

For example, TD Direct Investing offers online services for those new to online investing as well as those who are more experienced. 

TD Direct Investing also has an online learning centre which Moorhouse said provides customers with video lessons to broaden their investing knowledge. They also offer webinars and online master classes. 

RBC also released a new feature to their mobile banking app earlier this month called the RBC Mobile Student Edition aimed at teaching generation Z about money management and financial literacy. 

According to RBC’s research, 38 per cent of post-secondary students and 33 per cent of high school students feel like they have their finances under control. 

RBC created this feature within its mobile app to respond to the significant need for financial literacy resources available to young adults. 

Rami Thabet, RBC’s vice-president of digital product, worked with 400 young adults to come up with their app.

“What we heard loud and clear was that their financial needs were different,” Thabet said. 

In addition to having a simple design and personalization features, the Student Edition focuses on accessibility like explaining key banking terminology and financial terms in a way that younger users can understand, Thabet explained. 

The feature also puts savings at the forefront and allows users to set up reoccurring savings right from the home screen of the app.  

Different versions of financial success

Andrew Au, millennial expert and co-founder of a marketing consultancy firm called Intercept Group, said one of the issues banks have with supporting younger generations and their debt is keeping up with their changing idea of financial success. 

Au said success for baby boomers meant financial stability which is not the case for millennials or generation Z. 

“Success, now, is about pleasure. It’s about enjoying the ride. It’s not about getting to any one destination,” Au said. 

“I think it comes down to how the definition of success is evolving and banks need to keep up with that.”

Au said he personally likes Wealthsimple because it’s an example of an online investment company that understands millennials and their idea of financial success.

Andrew Au, co-founder of Intercept Group, said millennials have a different version of financial success compared to older generations. (Submitted by Andrew Au)

Wealthsimple is a digital investment manager that combines technology and human interaction to provide customers with investment products and advice.

80 per cent of the firm’s clients are under the age of 45. 

“This demographic really understands what technology can do,” Michael Allen, portfolio manager at Wealthsimple, said.

“They expect to manage their money from their phones … it needs to be really simple and accessible.”

Wealthsimple offers clients various products like Wealthsimple Invest, Wealthsimple Save, and Wealthsimple Trade.  The first one offers low-fee funds, the second functions like a high interest savings account, and the last one allows users to trade individual stocks.

The company also launched their Investing Master Class which teaches consumers the basics of investing and personal finance through a series of short video episodes. 

“It all boils back down to taking the jargon out of the industry,” Allen said. “So making it fun, making it exciting to learn about personal finance is really important to us.”

Allen said Wealthsimple recognizes there is a stigma from previous generations around being open about personal finances and their goal is to try to break down those walls. 

“The more conversations we can have about money, the better people will be at making future financial decisions.”

Pays off in the long run

For Moorhouse, talking about finances openly with other people helped her along her own personal finance journey. 

Getting to hear personal experiences from others about their finances through, for example, a blog or forum is different compared to getting advice from someone at the bank, Moorhouse said. 

She said it is going to take the bigger banks a little longer to catch up to these smaller credit unions or online banks but the key is to focus on transparency and educating their clients. 

“They will be better off for it because their clients will be more inclined to stay with them if they feel like they’re getting that extra help and that value,” Moorhouse said. 

Tips to Opt for the Right Baby Hair Clipper

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Cutting kids’ hair using scissors is not easy since they tend to move around. So, what is the easy way out then? You can buy baby hair clippers. They are necessary to cut young kid’s hair. You can find a myriad of hair clippers on the market these days.

Most mothers use the same trimmer for both kids and adults. Some opt for big trimmers that have a lot of attachments. Some people choose a hair trimmer based on the popularity of a brand, while others opt for the cheapest model. Given below are a few tips that may help you buy the right one.

1. The Brands

First off, the brand is a factor that mothers should take into account when opting for a hair trimmer. Since you will be using the product for a long period of time, make sure you make the choice carefully. Usually, top brand tends to stand the test of time. They are worth the extra cost.

Typically, top brands offer a host of features. These products don’t make too much noise so you can cut your baby’s hair even when it’s sleeping. Moreover, these machines are fast. The job won’t take more than 5 minutes.

2. Highlights

Since hair clippers are aimed at barbers, you can use them to make as many hairstyles as you like. Mothers can make use of hair clippers to cut their kids’ hair from the comfort of their homes. They won’t need to head to the salon anymore.

These products offer excellent features like high safety, ease of use, compact design and quiet operation.

Although most products are electricity-operated, you can recharge the device and use it as many times as possible.

3. The Compact Design

Since these products are compact, you can easily carry them around wherever you want.

You can trim the hair of your baby while it’s sleeping as the unit makes very low noise. The good thing about buying a baby clipper is that you can save a lot of money as you won’t need to go to the salon. This can save you a lot of time and money.

4. Safe to Use

As a matter of fact, these hair trimmers are safe for kids of all ages. The easy operation and simple design make it easier for you to hold the machine and make the hairstyles you want.

5. Recharging is Convenient

It’s easy to recharge these units. Most of the devices don’t take more than 10 hours to recharge. Once charged, you can use it for up to 60 minutes. So, one charge may last around an hour. So, make sure the unit you are going to buy has a powerful motor. If the motor is weak, it won’t be able to do the job properly.

Long story short, if you are looking for an easy way of trimming your baby’s hair, we suggest that you opt for a good quality baby hair clipper. This device will make your life a lot easier.

Narcissistic Baby Boomers Thrive On Loopholes & Technicalities

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Three Steps To More Profitable Customers In The Era Of Artificial Intelligence

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Artificial intelligence

Oracle

In a recent survey of 1,100 adults (from Gen Z to Baby Boomers), 57% said they’d gladly share their personal data with brands in exchange for custom-tailored experiences. Surprisingly, only 15% of those respondents had any faith that brands would actually deliver personalized experiences to them.

The biggest problem for most marketers is that they lack a customer data strategy. “You’ve got to have a strategy to get your customer data ready for AI,” says Joe Fuster, global vice president of Oracle Customer Experience Cloud. “If you don’t, you’re just going to wind up with more disconnected experiences.”

Fuster, who will be speaking at Oracle OpenWorld in September, offers a three-step approach to help marketing executives create an AI-era customer data strategy that predicts and prescribes specific communications, product discounts, and service offers that consumers are most likely to use to make a purchase at any given moment, pushing the likelihood of increasing profitability with each customer interaction to unprecedented highs.

Ready to create your own AI-era data strategy? Here’s a sneak peek at Fuster’s three-step approach to get you started.

1. Unify customer data across business applications, communications channels, and connected devices.

In most companies, customer data is managed in discrete storage containers, which have limited direct integration to marketing, sales, service, and commerce applications. These data silos make it difficult for marketers, or any customer-facing personnel, to understand who their customers are, let alone influence their purchasing decisions in any meaningful way.

Fuster advises companies to unify all of their customers’ data together, regardless of the source application or device or channel from which it was captured. “It’s really important for a service agent to know if the customer they’re dealing with just ordered a new tractor, so he doesn’t mistakenly offer her discounts on a backhoe attachment or an extended warranty for the model she currently owns,” he says. “But the only way an agent would know that is if the sales application was integrated with the service app.”

2. Organize customer data so it can be modeled by AI and then used in a way that aligns to your company’s top business priorities.

Machine-learning algorithms can model massive amounts of customer data instantly. This helps marketers predict, for example, which leads are most likely to convert into sales, and then prescribes what actions they should take in order to help sales teams quickly close those deals.

But training an algorithm to recognize a qualified lead requires more than “just turning on the AI switch,” warns Fuster. “Marketers must start with clean data and then curate those records, which reflect all of the key characteristics of similar leads that have converted into profitable sales.”

3. Use a decision-making platform to recommend certain products or services to offer customers in the precise moments when the customers are most likely to purchase them.

Most marketers today only know when certain offers were sent to customers and how those customers responded, Fuster says. “But that data says nothing about the customer’s personal interests, browsing histories, abandoned shopping carts, or other indicators that signal the customer’s propensity to buy and predict what he or she wants or needs right now.”

This is where customer intelligence platforms can help. By instantly capturing online and offline marketing, sales, and service data, applying machine-learning algorithms to that data in real time—and then presenting each individual customer with offers that are most relevant to them—marketers can not only make their customers happier and more loyal, they can also make their companies more profitable.

For example, Gen Z and Millennial consumers tend to value the experiences they have with brands as more important than the products or services they receive from them. In the research cited above, 4 out of 10 respondents said they are willing to pay as much as 20% more for a highly personalized, custom-tailored, and dynamic customer experience.

“Customer intelligence platforms aren’t just the latest tools marketers can use to segment markets, automate campaigns, or qualify and convert leads,” Fuster says. “They provide the very infrastructure brands need to secure their long-term competitive advantage.”

If you’re planning to attend Oracle OpenWorld on a full-conference pass and want to learn more, catch Fuster’s two presentations: “Unify Your Customer Intelligence for the AI Era” and “Learn How to Prevail in the Experience Economy.”

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Most marketing pros know that mass marketing is dead, and that mass personalization through artificial intelligence killed it. Yet few marketers have prepared their organizations to deliver personalized customer experiences at scale in the era of AI.

In a recent survey of 1,100 adults (from Gen Z to Baby Boomers), 57% said they’d gladly share their personal data with brands in exchange for custom-tailored experiences. Surprisingly, only 15% of those respondents had any faith that brands would actually deliver personalized experiences to them.

The biggest problem for most marketers is that they lack a customer data strategy. “You’ve got to have a strategy to get your customer data ready for AI,” says Joe Fuster, global vice president of Oracle Customer Experience Cloud. “If you don’t, you’re just going to wind up with more disconnected experiences.”

Fuster, who will be speaking at Oracle OpenWorld in September, offers a three-step approach to help marketing executives create an AI-era customer data strategy that predicts and prescribes specific communications, product discounts, and service offers that consumers are most likely to use to make a purchase at any given moment, pushing the likelihood of increasing profitability with each customer interaction to unprecedented highs.

Ready to create your own AI-era data strategy? Here’s a sneak peek at Fuster’s three-step approach to get you started.

1. Unify customer data across business applications, communications channels, and connected devices.

In most companies, customer data is managed in discrete storage containers, which have limited direct integration to marketing, sales, service, and commerce applications. These data silos make it difficult for marketers, or any customer-facing personnel, to understand who their customers are, let alone influence their purchasing decisions in any meaningful way.

Fuster advises companies to unify all of their customers’ data together, regardless of the source application or device or channel from which it was captured. “It’s really important for a service agent to know if the customer they’re dealing with just ordered a new tractor, so he doesn’t mistakenly offer her discounts on a backhoe attachment or an extended warranty for the model she currently owns,” he says. “But the only way an agent would know that is if the sales application was integrated with the service app.”

2. Organize customer data so it can be modeled by AI and then used in a way that aligns to your company’s top business priorities.

Machine-learning algorithms can model massive amounts of customer data instantly. This helps marketers predict, for example, which leads are most likely to convert into sales, and then prescribes what actions they should take in order to help sales teams quickly close those deals.

But training an algorithm to recognize a qualified lead requires more than “just turning on the AI switch,” warns Fuster. “Marketers must start with clean data and then curate those records, which reflect all of the key characteristics of similar leads that have converted into profitable sales.”

3. Use a decision-making platform to recommend certain products or services to offer customers in the precise moments when the customers are most likely to purchase them.

Most marketers today only know when certain offers were sent to customers and how those customers responded, Fuster says. “But that data says nothing about the customer’s personal interests, browsing histories, abandoned shopping carts, or other indicators that signal the customer’s propensity to buy and predict what he or she wants or needs right now.”

This is where customer intelligence platforms can help. By instantly capturing online and offline marketing, sales, and service data, applying machine-learning algorithms to that data in real time—and then presenting each individual customer with offers that are most relevant to them—marketers can not only make their customers happier and more loyal, they can also make their companies more profitable.

For example, Gen Z and Millennial consumers tend to value the experiences they have with brands as more important than the products or services they receive from them. In the research cited above, 4 out of 10 respondents said they are willing to pay as much as 20% more for a highly personalized, custom-tailored, and dynamic customer experience.

“Customer intelligence platforms aren’t just the latest tools marketers can use to segment markets, automate campaigns, or qualify and convert leads,” Fuster says. “They provide the very infrastructure brands need to secure their long-term competitive advantage.”

If you’re planning to attend Oracle OpenWorld on a full-conference pass and want to learn more, catch Fuster’s two presentations: “Unify Your Customer Intelligence for the AI Era” and “Learn How to Prevail in the Experience Economy.”

Baby Boomers and Aging Parents

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I just watched the movie called "The Thing About My Folks" with Paul Reiser. If you want a stroll down memory lane of what it is or was like to have your parents around, this will do it. It has enough to make you laugh and pause while you fill in the scenes with what your own dad would have said and the types of interactions that were of the times. Dad at work while mom was at home with us and dinner was put on the table by 5:30 every night. If you weren't there, you got the aluminum plate left in the oven until you got home. Dads went fishing and to ball games or they listened on the AM radio. They read the paper after super and watched the news at 6 o'clock. Their way of putting stability in our lives was by schedules. You knew that Thursday night was grocery shopping night and that chores were done on Saturday before you could go out to play and Sunday noon was the main dinner of the week.

You never thought of them as being like you and the way you interact with your children or relationship. We didn't see them as a couple like us; we saw them as Mom and Dad instead of sexual beings. The technology of today broadened a very large generation gap for the parents of us baby boomers. I see that we still want and expect something (I don't know if we even know what that is) from our parents yet communication gaps fail to render the right outcome. Unfortunately, some may pass away before we figure out what that "something" is but you know for sure that your children won't lack for it.

If you still have your parents, it's not too late. You can try talking to them from an honest point without blaming them for every wrong turn you managed to take in your own life. They respond from the time frame they were raised. You just have to take into consideration the gap time of your age to theirs. If they were young parents in the 1940's and 1950's look at the era before jumping down their throats. They raised you according to the times, the technology and the financial ability they possessed. The other thing to keep in mind is your interpretation of anything that was said or done when you were young. You have kept that child's interpretation alive for years. If the same things were said today with the education and maturity of now, don't you think the outcome would have been different? Sometimes it is just having the nerve to ask them what they meant. It is surprising to find out the answers. It turns out totally different then what you thought or dramatized.

I'm sure after seeing the dynamics of them interacting with your grand-parents, that they had all the same differences and gaps as we did. Times keep changing and even if you're determined to have a great relationship with your children, technology has leaped ahead again and creates another big gap. We seem to be involved more with our grandchildren and possibly can relate to them easier than we could our own. We can be the bridge between our children and grandchildren.

With better health and awareness, we can be present mentally, physically and emotionally longer for our growing families. Keeping our minds open helps too!

Why the local job market keeps getting tighter – The Buffalo News

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It’s been 19 years since the local unemployment rate was this low during July.

The region’s unemployment rate dropped to 4.3% in July, slightly below the 4.4% rate in July 2018 and its lowest level for any July since at 2000.

While the pace of hiring across the Buffalo Niagara region remains well below the national average, the latest report on unemployment from the state Labor Department shows that the Buffalo Niagara job market continues to run short on workers at a time when the region is adding jobs at a 1% annualized pace.

With the labor pool slowly shrinking as baby boomers retire, even a modest uptick in hiring can push down the jobless rate.

And the shortage of qualified workers makes it hard for businesses to hire.

“The local job market is still very strong, even though local employers are having trouble finding workers,” said Timothy Glass, the Labor Department’s regional economist in Buffalo.

While local job growth is only about two-thirds of the national average, the unemployment rate has been steadily dropping because of a shrinking pool of available workers, caused in large part by a wave of retiring baby boomers.

The July jobless rate of 4.3% isn’t adjusted for seasonal factors, so it isn’t directly comparable with different months, but local unemployment has been this low during July since 2000.

Over the last seven years, the number of local workers who are unemployed has been cut more than in half. That means companies are facing stiffer competition when they try to hire.

It also means that workers with sought-after skills are in especially short supply. In the last year, the number of unemployed people has dropped by 4%. Many of the remaining unemployed face barriers to entering the workforce, such as skills, child care or transportation.

The local job market is tight, but it’s even tighter in other places.

The Buffalo Niagara region’s record-low unemployment rate is slightly higher than the jobless rate statewide and across the country. But only three of New York’s 15 major metro areas – Binghamton, New York City and Watertown – have a higher unemployment rate than the Buffalo Niagara region.

There’s even a disparity across Buffalo Niagara, too. The 4.6% unemployment rate in Niagara County is higher than the 4.2% jobless rate in Erie County.