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Just How Many Seniors Are Having Sex?

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For most people, the stereotype of senior sex, sex after 60, 70, or, heaven forbid, 80, is some version of "I don't think so!"

It's gotten so bad that many people think of senior sex as some version of dirty old men, or "cougars," older women who are only interested in younger men. These are the same people who are convinced their parents, and certainly their grandparents, wouldn't still be doing "that."

Now a recent study by the American Association for Retired People, has found the picture younger people have of us older folks isn't anywhere near the real story.

The survey found half of the respondents over 60 enjoy sexual activity at least once a month. With a significant portion of those saying, they were having sex at least once a week.

Not what most younger people would believe about the oldsters in their lives.

The major change has been the attitude older people have about senior sex. Most believe sexuality is a valid and appropriate part of life, no matter how old they are.

Then, too, as the baby boomers live longer, especially those who embrace a healthier life style, the rate of sexual experience with aging will start to increase.

About two-thirds of the seniors who were surveyed reported having a satisfying sexual relationship is an important component of their quality of life, and the majority are "extremely satisfied," or "somewhat satisfied," with their sex lives.

Those satisfied seniors keep up with the new information, medical advances and resources for continuing to improve their satisfaction and pleasure as they age.

Fortunately, the amount of information and resources for seniors about sexuality and sexual health is increasing all the time. As the Boomers have started entering the Senior ranks, the markets have grown so large business and medicine can no longer afford to ignore them.

While it takes some thoughtfulness to sift through all the options, there is information and resources for just about any issue or concern you may have.

The key is separating the wheat from the chaff, and finding resources that are appropriate, effective, and safe.

Meals On Wheels Serves Up Breakfast, Lunch And Community At Local Diner . News

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Usually Meals on Wheels means home delivery or lunch at a senior center. For more than 50 years, the federal government has been funding the program to make sure older Americans get the nutrition they need. Now, a project in Vancouver, Wash., is trying to use those funds for something new: a retro-hip diner, where seniors can get eggs, coffee, and community.

On the surface, The Diner looks like any other diner. Servers making sure the coffee is topped off, local business people having meetings, regulars who know the whole menu. There are the usual diner specialties, with some modern nods — cage-free eggs and local produce — and a retro vibe.

“They play Frank Sinatra in the mornings, and it makes me so happy,” says Autumn Zukauskus, who comes for breakfast weekly. “Eggs and Frank Sinatra: perfect breakfast.”

But when a younger patron like Zukauskus reaches for her credit card, seniors like Chris Bingenheimer pull out a little green dining card.

“If you can donate, you do. If you don’t, you don’t,” Bingenheimer explains. “And it’s no big deal to them.”

That’s because the entire diner is a project of the local organization Meals on Wheels People. If you look closer, you’ll notice a few differences from other restaurants. The chairs are on casters, to scoot out easily if they need to make space for a wheelchair. The coffee cups have large handles, to accommodate arthritic fingers. The building and finishes were designed and selected to minimize noise and maximize comfort.

Avoiding stigma

Suzanne Washington is the CEO of Meals on Wheels People, which serves about 5,000 meals a day. Most of these are home delivery, and about a third are in senior centers. But people don’t always want to go to a senior center.

“We heard lots of folks say it was just too much of a stigma to go,” Washington says.

Some baby boomers think senior centers are just for their grandparents. Or they’re still working, and can’t get away for lunch. So, Washington thought, ‘Why not try a restaurant?’

“A restaurant that is inter-generational. It’s good food,” says Washington. “And at the same time, the paying public can help offset the cost of those in our program.”

There’s a slightly different menu for participating seniors — like an added fruit cup or a glass of milk — to meet nutritional requirements. And some regular menu items aren’t part of the program.

“Because we can never make eggs benedict meet regulations,” Washington says. “It just doesn’t work.”

But the menu is still delicious, and the diner’s been averaging 140 subsidized meals each month. They’ve signed up an average of 38 new members per month — about three times the number that sign up for Meals on Wheels at their traditional senior centers. And those who come for the meal donate more for it — the average donation is $2.46, which is four times higher than the donation at a senior center. And for an organization that provides 1.2 million senior meals annually, every increase is significant.

New sign-ups also get a visit from a client service coordinator, who does assessments, and checks if seniors need to be connected to additional services — the sort of information that they might have found at a traditional senior center.

The decline in participation at traditional senior centers isn’t just a problem in the Pacific Northwest.

“It is a national trend, where many senior centers are witnessing declining participation rates,” explains Manoj Pardasani, a provost and professor of social work at Hunter College.

Providing engagement

Pardasani says the decline is due to a number of factors: centers that haven’t innovated to reflect the diversity of the population, or people who look down on senior centers as something only for “needy” people. And he says the downturn is concerning, because these centers provide far more than just food. They provide community engagement, and combat isolation, which provides a benefit for mental and emotional health.

“The core belief behind meals is the socialization aspect,” says Pardasani. “We’re human beings, we’ve been socialized to be social animals.”

And The Diner is a social place. You can see it in the customers joking with the staff, the people who bring in an older neighbors, the seniors who carpool together for a meal.

Young people like Amber Zukauskus come for that camaraderie just as much as for the little pies.

“Everyone here is so nice,” says Zukauskus. “And they pay everybody a living wage, and so all your tips just go to donations for Meals on Wheels, which is amazing. That’s something I want to give money to.”

The Diner has gone through the usual hiccups of starting a new restaurant — dealing with staffing, figuring out the lunch rush, adjusting portion size so that seniors might have some extra to take home and eat later. Meals on Wheels People received some grant money to help with start up costs, and they expect to turn a profit in their third year. But even early on, they seem to be hitting their stride. It’s a bustling, thriving business.

Chris Bingenheimer learned about The Diner from a friend, and came in to share a meal. He sometimes goes to a senior center, but was never a fan of the made-in-advance food, or the minimal choices, or of the fact he had to be called up for a meal like at the high school cafeteria. He said he’ll definitely be back to The Diner.

“The staff is very friendly,” says Bingenheimer. “They don’t look down on you because you’re with the Meals on Wheels program. They treat you kindly. The service is impeccable.”

Bingenheimer is a senior using Meals on Wheels. And at The Diner, he’s also just a guy, sitting with a friend, having a good breakfast.

Copyright 2020 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

An Overview of Sunshine Cleaning

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The movie Sunshine Cleaning, which got released back in the beginning of this year, was finally offered without charge through my TV cable plan. I have really been itching to watch it based on all the great things that I have heard about it and just finished viewing it.

I will touch upon some of the aspects of the movie while still keeping the majority of it unknown to you. Amy Adams and Emily Blunt play two sisters, Rose and Norah Lorkowski, who happen to be somewhere between 27 – 33 years old and reside in New Mexico.

Since their mother had died when they were really little, the sisters were reared by their father who was able to give them lots of love throughout those difficult years. Rose's son Oscar, who is played by Jason Spevack, is about 8 years old.

The fact that Oscar did not have a father around while he was growing up contributed to several difficult times during his life and, despite the fact that he has been educated, he is still not understood.

Now both Norah and Rose continually found it hard to make it in life and went through a lot of hard times financially. He is not doing all that much better than they are, yet their Dad has discovered one way to make it.

Norah and Rose make the decision to begin a business, and that is what this movie is mainly about. It is not a business that you would normally think of because cleaning up areas where people have died is what this business happens to be. Every bit of residue and blood has to be removed from the area, but moving the dead bodies is not required.

The way that they build up their unusual business and everything that happens with respect to it are shown in this movie. And, throughout it, Rose and Oscar's and Rose and Norah's relationships are highlighted, as well as many other ones.

The actors in this movie all do a fantastic job and give you a true sense of just how they feel during the hard times and great times. It is my recommendation that you watch this movie as it is a drama that is of the utmost quality.

Sustainability more embedded in purchase decisions | Apparel Industry News

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The majority of respondents across generations expect retailers and brands to become more sustainable

The majority of respondents across generations expect retailers and brands to become more sustainable

Expectations for more sustainable retail practices are growing as the oldest members of Generation Z move into the workforce, a new study has found.

According to ‘The State of Consumer Spending‘ by technology firm First Insight, 62% of Generation Z survey participants prefer to buy from sustainable brands, on par with Millennials, while 54% of Generation X and 44% of the Silent Generation said the same. However, only 39% of Baby Boomers agreed, pointing to a vast divide between Baby Boomers and younger generations.

The research defines the Silent Generation as those born from 1928-1945, Baby Boomers (1946-1964), Generation X (1965-1979), Millennials (1980-1994) and Generation Z (1995-2012).

Generation Z is also the most willing to pay more for sustainable products (73%) compared to Millennials (68%), Generation X (55%) and Baby Boomers (42%). Half of the Silent Generation expressed this sentiment. The majority of Generation Z (54%) are willing to spend an incremental 10% or more on sustainable products, versus 50% of Millennials, 34% of Generation X, 23% of Baby Boomers and 36% of the Silent Generation.

Of note, the majority of respondents across generations expect retailers and brands to become more sustainable, according to 73% of Generation Z, 78% of Millennials, 84% of Generation X, 73% of Baby Boomers and 68% of the Silent Generation.

“While Baby Boomers seem to be the holdouts when it comes to expecting more sustainable practices within retail overall, the research shows that with every generation, sustainability is becoming further embedded in purchase decisions,” says Greg Petro, CEO of First Insight.

“It’s incredibly important that retailers and brands continue to follow the voices of their customers. With Generation Z on track to becoming the largest generation of consumers this year, retailers and brands must start supercharging sustainability practices now if they are to keep pace with expectations around sustainability for these next-generation consumers, whether it is through consignment, upcycling, or even gifting around major holidays.”

When it comes to clothing, swaps and peer-to-peer marketplaces are the least popular model. While moderately popular with Millennials (24%) and Generation Z (29%), clothing swaps are not as widely adopted as other re-commerce models, with less than 20% of Gen X, Baby Boomer and the Silent Generation respondents reporting using them. Peer-to-peer marketplaces like Storr and rentals are least popular overall, with less than 10% of respondents reporting using them.

The study also found the majority of younger generations are buying upcycled products. Generation Z (59%) and Millennials (57%) say they would purchase upcycled products made of discarded objects or materials to create a product of higher quality or perceived value than the original, whereas fewer Generation X (47%) and Baby Boomers (38%) said the same. Interestingly, the Silent Generation was more inclined to buy upcycled products than Baby Boomers, with 52% saying they would buy upcycled products.

And when it comes to resale/consignment models, The RealReal, ThredUp, Poshmark, and Tradesy were reported as the second-most popular, with Generation Z (46%), Millennial (48%), and Generation X (46%) reporting they use these services. Baby Boomers (39%) and the Silent Generation (22%) are using them less, but still more than other re-commerce models.

Baby Boomers Were Taught America Is The Land Of The Free

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the 1950s and the 1960s were decades where many millions of baby boomers became involved with the civil rights movement, or at least supported the voting rights act and integration. Presented in this video is a clip from my 1996 part television series, making sense of the 60s, which explored among many other issues, why so many got involved–what the reasons were. I hope that this helps younger people understand some of the thinking at that time expressed by Northern and Southern white kids and by black Americans experiencing segregation.

Are You Hosting a Birthday Party and Need Party Ideas?

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The basics of creating a spectacular party includes party planning and coming with party ideas. Any get together will do for a birthday party, but a proper plan and creative party theme ideas can liven it up and make it special.

The first thing that you need to do when planning a birthday party is to set a budget. It is so easy to spend loads of money if you start shopping before your plan is intact.

The next thing is to set a date, time and place for your party. This will give you a timeline for getting ready for the party as well as providing the information that you will need for invitations. It can be disheartening when you have everything ready and the place where you were planning to have the party is booked.

Next, you will want to make a guest list so that you will know about how many people might be there. It is a good idea to include the honoree in creating the guest list if it isn't a surprise party. Forgetting to invite someone can cause hard feelings and you won't want to carry that on your shoulders.

Now to the fun part – choosing a theme. All of the party supplies revolve around your theme. For a child you might consider a popular cartoon character or a tea party for girls. For teens, movie themes are great and they love costume parties. For baby boomers, a fifty's theme might be nice or maybe a luau or an over the hill party.

There are tons of party theme ideas that can be adapted for any age. They can be serious and formal, corny and humorous, or just plain fun! It all really depends on the personality of the person that you are throwing the party for.

Once your theme is decided upon, you can begin shopping for the party supplies.

Here is a simple list of the things that you need to look for:

  • Invitations
  • A menu for serving meals or appetizers
  • The birthday cake and all of the trimmings
  • Paper goods and serving dishes
  • Decorations
  • Games or events for entertaining
  • A birthday gift and card for the birthday person

Voila! Your party is planned and ready to go off without a hitch. Be sure to request an RSVP when you send the invitations and include instructions for getting to place if it hard to find. Include a number where you can be easily reached prior to the party and for lost party goers. I am certain that your party will be a blast and will be remembered for years to come.

Burtons Grill & Bar Is Picking Up Speed And Expanding

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Burtons Grill

Burtons Grill & Bar, expanding steadily, located in Hingham, Massachusetts.

Courtesy of Burtons Grill

Launched in 2005, Burtons Grill & Bar, headquartered in Andover, Massachusetts, is picking up speed and increasing expansion. In fact, a leading industry trade magazine named it one of the 50 Emerging Restaurant Chains in the U.S.

Its reputation has grown due to its customizing its menu, its scratch kitchen, and chef-driven dishes.

In fact, it has expanded to 17 Burtons Grill & Bars, and also owns five Red Heat Taverns, a sister restaurant, or 22 combined. Though it’s strong in Massachusetts, it now covers eight states.

It opened up two new locations in 2019 and is adding two more in 2020, and likely three the next year, so it’s proliferating at an incremental but steady pace.

It’s owned by a combination of owner-operators and private investors who want to maintain quality control. In fact, all of its eateries are company-owned; none is franchised.

But though it might be considered a casual dining eatery, it aspires to be more than that. Its most popular dishes include General Tso’s cauliflower, classic burger, Mediterranean chicken risottos, and crab-crusted haddock.

It also has become known for specializing in allergy-free and gluten-free food.

Its average check is $32 per person and with beverages $55 per check, so it’s more upscale than most casual dining eateries.

Unlike most restaurant chains these days whose off-premises sales are spiking, Burtons Grill doesn’t offer delivery or partner with any of the many third-party vendors.

Most of its locations are sizable, averaging 5,000 to 6,500 square feet and accommodating 150 to 170 seating, with an additional 15 to 30 people at the bar.

Customer feedback on Yelp about Burtons Grill in Andover runs the gamut. One guest praised her Burtons Grill experience, saying, “great atmosphere, food, portions and drinks. The service is perfectly timed.” But two guests complained about the lengthy wait.

Here’s what Denise Baron Herrera, vice president of culinary operations, who has been with Burtons since its inception, said about the growth at Burtons Grill & Bar.

Burtons Grill & Bar launched in 2005 but has been picking up speed and expanding gradually. Why?

Herrera: We’ve always said we wanted to open about two restaurants a year. In 2016, we opened three Burtons and took a hiatus before that. We had four years between 2012 and 2016 where we developed our Red Heat Tavern brand. After 2016, we picked back up and opened two in 2017, one in 2018 and two in 2019. One factor is there have been better real-estate opportunities.

What makes Burtons Grill special?

Herrera: What has been successful for us from the very beginning is serving a great quality product for a reasonable price and allowing the guest to customize their experience.

Customize in what way?

Herrera: In a variety of ways. In term of service, we can be as fast or slow depending on your dining reasons. Another way is we have always offered split plates. If a guest wants a house salad or a California chicken sandwich, we’ll do halfie/halfie. We take modifications and guest requests. Over time, we’ve modified our prep recipe so that we can remove ingredients that guests find are highly allergenic.

You’re in eight states, but do you still see it as a local bar and grill?

Herrera: We like to be in our neighborhood and community. We want to give back and we want our general manager and management team to represent the fabric of the community. 

Why did you open Red Heat Tavern rather than keeping everything Burtons?

Herrera: Post recession, our CEO Kevin Harron had been speaking to friends and some hadn’t been dining at Burtons frequently anymore. We took a hit to our savings, and we had to make different decisions. We decided to build a second concept, slightly more causal, more tavernesque, with lower price points but still serving scratch quality food. Here’s the difference in menu composition: at Burtons we serve more filet, ribeye and scallops and at Red Heat we serve turkey tips, steak tips and meatloaf.

Describe your target audience.

Herrera: The target audience at Burtons is babyboomers.  In the eighties, casual dining became a sea of mediocrity and babyboomers were looking for an elevated dining experience. We saw a niche in polished casual and that’s where we came in.

How do you broaden that audience to appeal to millennials?

Herrera: Now we see baby boomers’ children are graduating from college and coming back as our guests.

You’ve become known for allergy-free food. Why? 

Herrera: Our CEO Kevin Harron is celiac, which is linked to wheat and gluten. We asked, if we could develop the menu for gluten- free dining, which is synergistic with customizing food? He said, ‘If you do it, make sure you do it right.’ We execute it at the highest level.

You’re all company-owned outlet with no franchises. Why?

Herrera: Because our brand, we believe, has so much attention to detail that we didn’t want to relinquish control and dilute our brand recognition and the trust in our guest experience.

You’re bucking the industry trend by not offering delivery. Why?

Herrera: We feel strongly about this. We don’t build restaurants of our size to have people take food away from us and be charged a premium price. We want to makes sure people dine in our restaurants and have the full guest experience. We do offer take out.

Aren’t you leaving money on the table by not offering it?

Herrera: We see restaurants declaring bankruptcy that went too deep into delivery and people aren’t coming into their restaurants any more.

Two years from today?

Herrera: I expect to have at least four new restaurants open. We’ve developed our menu composition more and continue to offer healthy lifestylesque options. We’ll have an engaged workforce that continues to focus on guest experience and delighting every guest one at a time.

Describe the three factors in Burtons continued success.

Herrera: 1. The quality and value proposition we offer our guests;

2. Service and hospitality;

3. Allergy-protocol, making sure our allergies dining is following the right steps of service.

“>

Launched in 2005, Burtons Grill & Bar, headquartered in Andover, Massachusetts, is picking up speed and increasing expansion. In fact, a leading industry trade magazine named it one of the 50 Emerging Restaurant Chains in the U.S.

Its reputation has grown due to its customizing its menu, its scratch kitchen, and chef-driven dishes.

In fact, it has expanded to 17 Burtons Grill & Bars, and also owns five Red Heat Taverns, a sister restaurant, or 22 combined. Though it’s strong in Massachusetts, it now covers eight states.

It opened up two new locations in 2019 and is adding two more in 2020, and likely three the next year, so it’s proliferating at an incremental but steady pace.

It’s owned by a combination of owner-operators and private investors who want to maintain quality control. In fact, all of its eateries are company-owned; none is franchised.

But though it might be considered a casual dining eatery, it aspires to be more than that. Its most popular dishes include General Tso’s cauliflower, classic burger, Mediterranean chicken risottos, and crab-crusted haddock.

It also has become known for specializing in allergy-free and gluten-free food.

Its average check is $32 per person and with beverages $55 per check, so it’s more upscale than most casual dining eateries.

Unlike most restaurant chains these days whose off-premises sales are spiking, Burtons Grill doesn’t offer delivery or partner with any of the many third-party vendors.

Most of its locations are sizable, averaging 5,000 to 6,500 square feet and accommodating 150 to 170 seating, with an additional 15 to 30 people at the bar.

Customer feedback on Yelp about Burtons Grill in Andover runs the gamut. One guest praised her Burtons Grill experience, saying, “great atmosphere, food, portions and drinks. The service is perfectly timed.” But two guests complained about the lengthy wait.

Here’s what Denise Baron Herrera, vice president of culinary operations, who has been with Burtons since its inception, said about the growth at Burtons Grill & Bar.

Burtons Grill & Bar launched in 2005 but has been picking up speed and expanding gradually. Why?

Herrera: We’ve always said we wanted to open about two restaurants a year. In 2016, we opened three Burtons and took a hiatus before that. We had four years between 2012 and 2016 where we developed our Red Heat Tavern brand. After 2016, we picked back up and opened two in 2017, one in 2018 and two in 2019. One factor is there have been better real-estate opportunities.

What makes Burtons Grill special?

Herrera: What has been successful for us from the very beginning is serving a great quality product for a reasonable price and allowing the guest to customize their experience.

Customize in what way?

Herrera: In a variety of ways. In term of service, we can be as fast or slow depending on your dining reasons. Another way is we have always offered split plates. If a guest wants a house salad or a California chicken sandwich, we’ll do halfie/halfie. We take modifications and guest requests. Over time, we’ve modified our prep recipe so that we can remove ingredients that guests find are highly allergenic.

You’re in eight states, but do you still see it as a local bar and grill?

Herrera: We like to be in our neighborhood and community. We want to give back and we want our general manager and management team to represent the fabric of the community. 

Why did you open Red Heat Tavern rather than keeping everything Burtons?

Herrera: Post recession, our CEO Kevin Harron had been speaking to friends and some hadn’t been dining at Burtons frequently anymore. We took a hit to our savings, and we had to make different decisions. We decided to build a second concept, slightly more causal, more tavernesque, with lower price points but still serving scratch quality food. Here’s the difference in menu composition: at Burtons we serve more filet, ribeye and scallops and at Red Heat we serve turkey tips, steak tips and meatloaf.

Describe your target audience.

Herrera: The target audience at Burtons is babyboomers.  In the eighties, casual dining became a sea of mediocrity and babyboomers were looking for an elevated dining experience. We saw a niche in polished casual and that’s where we came in.

How do you broaden that audience to appeal to millennials?

Herrera: Now we see baby boomers’ children are graduating from college and coming back as our guests.

You’ve become known for allergy-free food. Why? 

Herrera: Our CEO Kevin Harron is celiac, which is linked to wheat and gluten. We asked, if we could develop the menu for gluten- free dining, which is synergistic with customizing food? He said, ‘If you do it, make sure you do it right.’ We execute it at the highest level.

You’re all company-owned outlet with no franchises. Why?

Herrera: Because our brand, we believe, has so much attention to detail that we didn’t want to relinquish control and dilute our brand recognition and the trust in our guest experience.

You’re bucking the industry trend by not offering delivery. Why?

Herrera: We feel strongly about this. We don’t build restaurants of our size to have people take food away from us and be charged a premium price. We want to makes sure people dine in our restaurants and have the full guest experience. We do offer take out.

Aren’t you leaving money on the table by not offering it?

Herrera: We see restaurants declaring bankruptcy that went too deep into delivery and people aren’t coming into their restaurants any more.

Two years from today?

Herrera: I expect to have at least four new restaurants open. We’ve developed our menu composition more and continue to offer healthy lifestylesque options. We’ll have an engaged workforce that continues to focus on guest experience and delighting every guest one at a time.

Describe the three factors in Burtons continued success.

Herrera: 1. The quality and value proposition we offer our guests;

2. Service and hospitality;

3. Allergy-protocol, making sure our allergies dining is following the right steps of service.

All the World is a Stage and Retirement is No Different – Living the 3 Stages of Retirement

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Many young people today have two impressions of retirement, ie, that it will be "fun times of lazy, happy days and lounging around" or it will be "years of sadness filled with financial and health issues." Neither picture is accurate and creates a false sense of what will be in store for most of us.

Retirement life has been changing rather dramatically in recent years. Charlie Davidson wrote in "In the Service of Baby Boomers: A Seismic Mind Shift for Financial Service Providers" that retirement for most of us can really be dissected into 3 stages:

Stage 1: Individuals seek fulfillment and are in good health. This phase varies in length by individual or couple, but typically lasts from several years to as many as 15 or more years. During this stage, the individual seeks to achieve many previously unfilled goals. Examples include travel, time spent visiting friends and family, attending or participating in sports events, theater and so forth and / or working full time or part time in an occupation that could be built around a passion (like consulting, writing, mentoring, or helping others.) This stage is not to the exclusion of working for a living, particularly in these tough times. Nevertheless, it typically reflects the opportunity to apply skills and competencies to new challenges that will provide fulfillment to each individual on his / her own terms.

Stage 2: This stage is earmarked by the encroachment of a sense of "been there, done that," meaning that there is less need to travel or participate in accomplishing something, volunteering, helping others, etc. There is less a sense of having to be out and about. At this stage, the individual begins to lack the energy for big initiatives, like overseas travel, lengthy walks or hikes, hours on the golf course or a tough game of tennis. Individuals at this stage would still continue to get out, shop at the mall, head out to dinner and the theater, attend religious events and so forth, but would relegate their activities to those close to home. Spending time simply talking over a meal, watching TV, puttering around the house, reading a good book, and gardening appears to make life feel complete. Living the simple life seems to be the way to satisfaction. Continuing some exercise routines is recognized as important to maintaining one's health, although aches and pains, more meds and eating less is reflective of this stage. Stage 2 typically lasts 10-15 years, and is often experienced by individuals in their late 70's or early 80's, into their late 80's or early 90's. Sometimes this stage arrives earlier but rarely does it last into the late 90's.

Stage 3: This stage is often associated with how retirement used to be viewed, a time of limited activity, with some level of infirmity and / or a greater reliance on others for care and sustenance, ie, shopping and food preparation, housekeeping, etc . Individuals tend to slow down, nap more, and find themselves living the sedentary life. They will venture out for occasional trips to see friends or relatives, the theater, attend religious services, etc. Sharing stories and observations, or recalling earlier life events, bring moments of great joy. Watching TV, playing cards, reading books and newspapers, mark the passing of one's days. Some like to continue being creative through small woodworking or arts and crafts projects. Journaling and writing memoirs are also fulfilling at this stage of life. Certainly happiness can be found at this stage if one takes care of one's self, or even if one needs the help of a caregiver. The simple pleasures of feeling reasonably healthy, having a pleasant day and communicating with friends and family make life worth living.

Each stage requires different funding for that lifestyle. Stage 1 requires money for travel, housing and fun. Stage 2 requires money for entertainment, medical care and maintaining one's lifestyle. Stage 3 requires money for occasional entertainment, more medical care and possibly caregivers.

So what's the bottom line? Life in retirement comes in phases or stages, but there is a consistency with each stage continuing to be focused on freedom of choice, fulfillment, friends and family and enjoyment. Let's hope this is what your future holds, because, honestly, nothing could be better for each of us than to experience the full extent of all of these stages.

© Donald C. Strauss, 2010

Portsmouth Baby Boomers who would become teenagers of the ’60s | Nostalgia

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All smiles from children from Corpus Christi School, Gladys Avenue, North End, Portsmouth, 1955. Picture: Malcolm Jones

Malcolm Jones sent me this photograph plus some names of those pictured, but not in any order.

They are: David Walsh, Malcolm Jones, Keith Hewitt, David Dobbin, Michael Brown, Carol Brown, Andrew Jones, Michael Jones, and Malcolm Walsh. Also possibly Rachel Dobbin.

Malcolm says it was taken before 1955 so most would have been born after the end of the war, to become known as Baby Boomers and teenagers of the 1960s.

I need help with this one. Can any reader tell me more? Picture: Barry Cox postcard collection

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The i newsletter cut through the noise

They were of an age of rock ’n’ roll but they would be part of the beat boom 10 years later when The Beatles and the sound of Liverpool ruled the airwaves.

• I am hoping some you senior readers from Milton can assist me with this postcard scene. All there is on the postcard is a caption which says it shows Milton Creek. I know little about the location.

There are wharves either side of the inlet along with several cranes and perhaps warehouses on the right as well. The cottage on the left might be of some relevance to someone.

Baby Room Themes – Nautical Baby Bedding

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Nautical baby bedding will send your baby to sleep dreaming of his future sailing adventures. Perfect for the baby that lives by the ocean or the sea, this baby room theme will rock your little one to sleep in an adorable, serene environment.

Unlike nautical crib bedding sets of the past, this baby room theme does not limit your baby's dreams to just little rowboats. Today's nautical crib bedding collections can feature pirates, underwater creatures (fish, octopus, turtles, and other sea animals), steamboats, and more.

What makes the nautical nursery theme so popular among parents is the versatility in the designs of baby bedding. You find nautical crib bedding sets that use a vintage look or a more contemporary look.

If you want to find traditional crib sets in this baby room theme, you can find several that come in traditional pastel blue color palettes that are embellished with steering helms, anchors, boats, and lighthouses. Now, if you are a modern parent who wants a contemporary nursery, you are going to love nautical baby bedding collections that combine other motifs, such as safari animals or the transportation theme (think cars, trains, and planes) with the nautical baby room theme.

This nursery theme is primarily for boys, though it may work in a gender neutral baby's room as well. You can find several nautical crib sets that feature green and white color palettes. Most nautical baby crib bedding sets feature mostly blue color schemes. But you can find almost every shade of blue imaginable – from soft blue to primary blue to turquoise and everything else in between.

You have almost endless decorating possibilities with nautical baby bedding and this baby room theme. While most baby crib bedding sets in this nursery theme only come in 4 or 6 piece crib sets, you can find coordinating nursery décor and accessories in the baby crib bedding collection. You may want to decorate your nautical baby room with switch plate covers, wall decals, window valances, wallpaper borders, or decorative lamps.

If you can't afford coordinating nursery decor with your nautical baby crib bedding set, consider going to the thrift store or a local yard sale and picking up items that are related to the sea. You can use these as decoration for your baby's room. You may to find an old painting of ships or boats and place it on a nursery wall, or place a big seashell on a nearby windowsill.

Have fun decorating!